American Literature and the Free Market, 1945-2000

American Literature and the Free Market, 1945-2000

American Literature and the Free Market The years after World War Two have seen a widespread fascination with the free market In this book Michael W Clune considers this fascination in postwar literature In the fictional worlds created by

  • Title: American Literature and the Free Market, 1945-2000
  • Author: Michael W. Clune
  • ISBN: 9780521513999
  • Page: 394
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The years after World War Two have seen a widespread fascination with the free market In this book, Michael W Clune considers this fascination in postwar literature In the fictional worlds created by works ranging from Frank O Hara s poetry to nineties gangster rap, the market is transformed, offering an alternative form of life, distinct from both the social visions ofThe years after World War Two have seen a widespread fascination with the free market In this book, Michael W Clune considers this fascination in postwar literature In the fictional worlds created by works ranging from Frank O Hara s poetry to nineties gangster rap, the market is transformed, offering an alternative form of life, distinct from both the social visions of the left and the individualist ethos of the right These ideas also provide an unsettling example of how art takes on social power by offering an escape from society American Literature and the Free Market presents a new perspective on a number of wide ranging works for readers of American post war literature.

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      394 Michael W. Clune
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      Posted by:Michael W. Clune
      Published :2019-08-20T04:13:35+00:00

    248 Comment

    Clune suggests that in a number of post-war works, from O'Hara to Acker to 90s rap, the aesthetic provides a realm where intersubjective social relations are replaced by a collective experience based entirely upon the market. It's an interesting idea, and his conclusion has particularly strong points, particularly his suggestion that for Marx the ontology of man is based upon being an actor (in a Heideggerian sense) rather than being an object whose subjectivity is determined by being visible to [...]

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