Serenity Found: More Unauthorized Essays on Joss Whedon's Firefly Universe

Serenity Found: More Unauthorized Essays on Joss Whedon's Firefly Universe

Serenity Found More Unauthorized Essays on Joss Whedon s Firefly Universe A lot has happened since Finding Serenity We learned River s secret Mal took on the Alliance Our favorite crew became Big Damn Heroes And the Browncoats proved that hard work passion and a little fan

  • Title: Serenity Found: More Unauthorized Essays on Joss Whedon's Firefly Universe
  • Author: Jane Espenson Jacob Clifton Michael Marano P. Gardner Goldsmith Alex Bledsoe Shanna Swendson Lani Diane Rich Eric Greene
  • ISBN: 9781933771212
  • Page: 484
  • Format: Paperback
  • A lot has happened since Finding Serenity We learned River s secret Mal took on the Alliance Our favorite crew became Big Damn Heroes And the Browncoats proved that hard work, passion and a little fan coordination can do the impossible Serenity Found takes the contents of Finding Serenity even further, exploring not just the show but the events of the film as well, toA lot has happened since Finding Serenity We learned River s secret Mal took on the Alliance Our favorite crew became Big Damn Heroes And the Browncoats proved that hard work, passion and a little fan coordination can do the impossible Serenity Found takes the contents of Finding Serenity even further, exploring not just the show but the events of the film as well, to create an anthology that s even thought provoking, fascinating and far thinking than its predecessor Acclaimed science fiction author Orson Scott Card lauds Serenity as film sci fi finally done right Writer and comedian Natalie Haynes reveals the real feminist savvy of the Firefly universe the girls get the guns and the gags Pop culture critic Michael Marano connects damaged, ass kicking River to the other weaponized women of the Whedonverse Multiverse executive producer Corey Bridges explains why the world of Firefly is the perfect setting for an MMORPG Mutant Enemy s visual effects wizard Loni Peristere relates what he s learned from Joss about telling stories, and tells a story of his own about Serenity s design Television Without Pity recapper Jacob Clifton frames Serenity as a parable about media how it controls us, how we can control it and how to separate the signal from the noise And Nathan Fillion, Firefly and Serenity s Captain Malcolm Reynolds, shares his affinity for Mal and his love of Mal s ship and crew.

    • Free Read [Science Book] ☆ Serenity Found: More Unauthorized Essays on Joss Whedon's Firefly Universe - by Jane Espenson Jacob Clifton Michael Marano P. Gardner Goldsmith Alex Bledsoe Shanna Swendson Lani Diane Rich Eric Greene ↠
      484 Jane Espenson Jacob Clifton Michael Marano P. Gardner Goldsmith Alex Bledsoe Shanna Swendson Lani Diane Rich Eric Greene
    • thumbnail Title: Free Read [Science Book] ☆ Serenity Found: More Unauthorized Essays on Joss Whedon's Firefly Universe - by Jane Espenson Jacob Clifton Michael Marano P. Gardner Goldsmith Alex Bledsoe Shanna Swendson Lani Diane Rich Eric Greene ↠
      Posted by:Jane Espenson Jacob Clifton Michael Marano P. Gardner Goldsmith Alex Bledsoe Shanna Swendson Lani Diane Rich Eric Greene
      Published :2019-06-05T07:23:39+00:00

    412 Comment

    What is there to say? Anything that takes me back into the world of Firefly and gives it serious consideration gets my vote. Never has there been a fictional world populated by more extraordinary men and women. And Jayne. WellJayne.As a fan, Nathan Fillion's short essay "I, Malcolm" is the one you'll most likely read first. Next, Orson Scott Card's "Catching Up with the Future" might catch your eye.For those who are science fiction fans, but not yet Browncoats, as fans of Firefly are known, well [...]

    The Book Report: Eighteen more essays about the moral, political, and ethical underpinnings, implications, and effects of the late, lamented "Firefly" TV series.My Review: Last collection had yummy-yummy Jewel Staite, aka Kaylee, writing about her favorite things in each episode; this collection has the slurpsome Nathan Fillion reflecting on being the Captain! For that alone, it's worth the price of admission! But wait! There's more! Loni Peristere (also a beauteous hunk of man-flesh, maybe Joss [...]

    Again, another entertaining and thought provoking read. A look at faith, at River Tam and the Weaponized Women of Whedonverse, how feminism and comedy thrive in Whedonverse and how the Captain and the Doctor are co-heroes. All of this and more topped off by I Malcolm: a look at our dear Captain Tightpants by none other than Nathan Fillion. Both of these books are edited by master storyteller Jane Espenson (Buffy, Battlestar Galactica, Dollhouse, Gilmore Girls, Ellen, Warehouse 13, and of course [...]

    Because one collection of essays about a TV show canceled after half a season is not enough. There are some interesting takes in this collection. A few veer a little too deeply into academia, but overall it's an interesting read for a Firefly/Serenity fan.

    Confession: I am an unabashed, flailing Firefly fangirl. I quote both the series and the movie on a regular basis—at length. I’ve made friends with coworkers at new jobs simply by wearing a Serenity t-shirt that led to hours of debate over lunch. I preemptively cry while watching the movie as it approaches that scene (you all know the one of which I speak), and it takes all my willpower not to bawl like a baby when it actually happens.In short, I’m strangely emotionally invested in the ‘ [...]

    I don't geek out on television shows or movies to the point that I read essays about them. This is the exception. It was interesting to read people's perceptions and personal experiences and see what they took away from Firefly/Serenity based, in no small part, on each person's filter. For me, Firefly/Serenity was libertarian porn. For other folks, it was a feminist piece. While to others, it was, well, let's just say, I don't share their filters, so I didn't, for example, see the nameless Opera [...]

    One of the things about punk rock that I like the best is the general belief that being "fans" isn't enough, or even the antithesis of how one should be punk (or live in the world). Beyond just DIY, the anti-fan ideology tells us we are participants. Given this background, I refuse to let people call my zine a "fanzine" or to reduce myself to a punk rock "fan" as so many columnists for the big punk mags seem to wind up as.I am a fan, however, of Firefly, probably the best TV show ever created. I [...]

    I love Serenity and the firefly series. I got into it because of my nieces encouragement. I was pleasantly surprised at how deep the analysis of the series and the movie was. Most of my reading is of books of a spiritual nature, I was really surprised at how deep it all was. I tend to think of secular stuff as secular but there is a lot of spirit to Serenity. I am going to really enjoy our annual browncoat meeting where we screen Serenity because I know more where to look for the technical stuff [...]

    I always want these 'essays on pop culture' books to read like intelligent conversations you have on the couch with your friend after drinking and watching an episode or two. Instead they often lean more towards the academically dry and pompous. I felt like this book struck a better balance than others I've read, with a few exceptions.I found the interview/essay from the special effects designer was particularly enlightening, and some of the analysis was well-argued without getting hung up in tr [...]

    i have watched the series twice of course and am a bonified groupie. I am kicking myself for having missed them at the 2007 comic con lecture series.I am always impressed with great visuals. The extras on the CD show how the space ship set is one continuous set for each of the two levels. the color schemes go from very warm for the companion's sex shuttle to very cool for the cockpit.The fusion between Chinese and American culture is delightful and the costumes, Mandarin swear words, cowboy boot [...]

    This collection of eighteen essays about the sadly-truncated Firefly franchise has a breadth that testifies to the extraordinary range and vision of that series. Feminism, libertarianism, religion, and the surprisingly lengthy history of the space western all find their places. In addition to the scholarly treatises of rabid fans, a couple of insiders offer new insight into the fantastic experience of making the show. Yes, it is clearly designed to appeal to people already in love with the serie [...]

    As a "Firefly" fan I was excited reading the first "Serenity" book. However, the lure and excitement of a critical analysis of a great series quickly wore off on me with this book. The first book offered essays that were varied and sparked my interest consistently, making me recount scenes from the series. While this book had moments when it would make me re-trace my steps and appreciate the thought that was put into "Serenity" there simply was not enough of those moments for me.Still, if you're [...]

    The analyses of Firefly/Serenity in this book kind of made me a little uncomfortable with my fandom. The Reavers are supposed to represent the savage stereotype of Native Americans from westerns? Firefly/Serenity supposedly presents the Confederacy as the noble heroes fighting for independence from "Alliance" aggression? I can't believe that the minds behind Buffy and Angel would be so tone deaf. But the allegory and the symbolism is there. I saw it as I read this book. And it makes me really un [...]

    I'm sure it's influenced by how much I love Firefly & Serenity, but this is one of my favorite of the Ben Bella books I've been reading. Some of the essays were barely even about the show or movie (which normally bugs me in these anthologies) and they were incredibly interesting!! Definitely recommended for anyone who enjoys 1) Speculative analytical writing and 2) Firefly/Serenity (both, really). I thoroughly enjoyed it and will look forward to starting my next BenBella book when I return t [...]

    There is just so much to enjoy about the short lived television series by Joss Whedon. And that is why there is not 1 but 2 books of essay’s about the show. Examining everything from it’s connections to the Civil War, Libertarianism, Media messages, and the strong female character of the Whedonverse. Really a great read if you are a flan of Firefly. (Kind made me want to write my own essay on the show.)

    Geoff Klock's close reading of the transitions between time frames in Out of Gas was lovely. Visual Effects Supervisor Loni Peristere's inside look at the creation of Serenity was super cool - and I loved reading how he got the same job on Buffy. The gender studies stuff was of interest to me as always. And there's an essay from Nathan Fillion! So, yeah. Necessary Browncoat reading material. The tone of a few essays made my skin crawl, but I'm a jerk like that.

    This collection of essays offers some different, deeper, ways to look at Firefly and Serenity. The book is well crafted, offering a wide range of insights and experiences. Upon rereading the title, I garnered even more. The essay by Nathan Fillion is especially poignant, as only Captain Mal can fully give you the experience of being Captain Mal. I would recommend this to any fan of Firefly, Serenity, or Joss Whedon.

    If you're a fan of the TV series Firefly, the kind of Browncoat who has watched the series over and over, you owe it to yourself to buy this book. The essays are excellent and even include one by Nathan Fillion on what it was like to be Malcolm Reynolds and one by a guy who worked on special effects (blanking on his name right now). Series is edited by Jane Espenson (who was one of the writers of the series) and her comments precede each essay.

    Some of these essays were actually 5-stars-worthy for me, in particular: "Mars needs women", "Girls, Guns and Gags". "Firefly and story structure" and "Signal to noise". Some just told me nothing, which is a pity and the sole reason I couldn't bring myself to give the book top marks. Despite this, I still really enjoyed it as a whole: good job!

    This is a followup to Finding Serenity, whcih came out roughly the same time as the movie. While the first volume was primarily about the what of Firefly/Serenity, this one is more about the who and why of everything in the Browncoatverse. From the writing to the acting to the special effects creation of the tv and moviesquite fascinating.

    A collection of 'unauthorised essays on Joss Whedon's Firefly universe.' It has got to be about the most unashamedly geektastic thing I've read. And I liked it mostly. It gets three stars for Nathan Fillion's contribution alone, and I really enjoyed some of the more feminist-leaning essays. On the other hand, not really interested in anything by Orson Scott Card or bloody libertarians.

    Not quite as good as the original Finding Serenity, but there are several entertaining essays here. Probably better suited for the diehard Browncoat than for the casual fan.I might have given it 4 stars if not for the all-too-frequent Trek bashing. It's a big 'verse, folks. There's room for everyone.

    I like most anything that takes me back to Serenity. That being said, the essays here were thought provoking as well as entertaining but it is for Brown Coats. If you are not one yet, go my child and buy the series and movie for about $20 and you will be one of us.

    The essays in this one weren't quite as awesome as the first collection, but they're still super fun and there were a handful of really good ones. I definitely only recommend to someone who absolutely loves Firefly, (like me.) ;)

    Interesting with a few good essays, but really pointed towards to hardcore Firefly fan. A large number of the essays were about how much Fox sucks and the behinds the scenes machinations that went into making the series. The first book (Finding Serenity) had generally better essays.

    This book is a fun read for any Browncoat. I think the topics in the first collection were more interesting to me personally, but I still found plenty to enjoy. Nathan Fillion's essay entitled "I, Malcolm" is almost worth the price alone.

    A fascinating look at the great, short-lived show Firefly. As a writer, it was an interesting look into why these characters and this 'verse sucked us all in so fully. I enjoyed reading this and it gave me some new things to look for and enjoy as I re-re-watched Firefly and Serenity again.

    Mixed quality in the essays, but worthwhile to a fan. I especially enjoyed "Freedom in an Unfree World" and "Firefly and Story Structure, Advanced". Didn't find much worth saying in Fillion's piece or "The Bonnie Brown Flag".

    If you love Firefly and/or Serenity, you'll love this book. Kick ass essays from a variety of perspectives (including one from Cap'n Tightpants.)

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