What Paul Meant

What Paul Meant

What Paul Meant A brilliant synthesis of the Apostle Paul s thought and influence written by a foremost Catholic intellectual Chicago Tribune All through history Christians have debated Paul s influence on the chur

  • Title: What Paul Meant
  • Author: Garry Wills
  • ISBN: 9780670037933
  • Page: 151
  • Format: Hardcover
  • A brilliant synthesis of the Apostle Paul s thought and influence, written by a foremost Catholic intellectual Chicago Tribune All through history, Christians have debated Paul s influence on the church Though revered, Paul has also been a stone on which many stumble Apocryphal writings by Peter and James charge Paul, in the second century, with being a tool of SaA brilliant synthesis of the Apostle Paul s thought and influence, written by a foremost Catholic intellectual Chicago Tribune All through history, Christians have debated Paul s influence on the church Though revered, Paul has also been a stone on which many stumble Apocryphal writings by Peter and James charge Paul, in the second century, with being a tool of Satan In later centuries Paul became a target of ridicule for writers such as Thomas Jefferson the first corruptor , George Bernard Shaw a monstrous imposition , and Nietzsche the Dysangelist However, as Garry Wills argues eloquently in this masterly analysis, what Paul meant was not something contrary to what Jesus meant Rather, the best way to know Jesus is to discover Paul Unlike the Gospel writers, who carefully shaped their narratives many decades after Jesus life, Paul wrote in the heat of the moment, managing controversy, and sometimes contradicting himself, but at the same time offering the best reflection of those early times What Paul Meant is a stellar interpretation of Paul s writing, examining his tremendous influence on the first explosion of Christian belief and chronicling the controversy surrounding Paul through the centuries Wills s many readers and those interested in the Christian tradition will warmly welcome this penetrating discussion of perhaps the most fascinating church father.

    What Paul Meant by Garry Wills Jan , To be honest, this is . stars, but it s far less What Paul Meant and So You Think You Know Luke, which wasn t quite what I was bargaining for A great deal of who we understand Paul to be we get from Luke s stories of his exploits in Acts, so I understand that Wills had to start there. What Paul Meant Garry Wills Books May , What Paul Meant highlights, through Paul s thirteen epistles, that the worship of God is a matter of interior love, not based on external observances, on temples or churches, on hierarchies or priesthoods He, as Jesus, saw only two basic moral duties, love of God and love of neighbor Both were liberators, not imprisoners. What Paul Meant Kindle edition by Garry Wills Religion May , What Paul Meant highlights, through Paul s thirteen epistles, that the worship of God is a matter of interior love, not based on external observances, on temples or churches, on hierarchies or priesthoods He, as Jesus, saw only two basic moral duties, love of God and love of neighbor Both were liberators, not imprisoners. What Paul Meant Garry Wills What Paul Meant is a stellar interpretation of pauls writing, examining his tremendous influence on the first explosion of Christian belief and chronicling the controversy surrounding Paul through the centuries Wills many readers and those interested in the Christian tradition will warmly welcome this penetrating discussion of perhaps the most fascinating church father. What Paul Meant by Garry Wills, Paperback Barnes Noble Paul, in What Paul Meant, is seen as a friend and spokesperson for Jesus CCD dave More than year ago Mr Willis sheds much needed light on St Paul In reading this book you will learn much about Paul the person Why he was what he was And some of the mystery about Paul is explained to better understand him. What Paul Meant by Garry Wills Review BookPage BookPage Dec , What Paul Meant is a fascinating read, worth examining by anyone with an open mind and an interest in Christianity and its most prolific early voice Howard Shirley is the author of Acts for God Dramatic Sketches for Contemporary Services He writes from Franklin, Tennessee What Paul Meant By Garry Wills.

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    248 Comment

    To be honest, this is 2.5 stars, but it's far less "What Paul Meant" and more "So You Think You Know Luke," which wasn't quite what I was bargaining for. A great deal of who we understand Paul to be we get from Luke's stories of his exploits in Acts, so I understand that Wills had to start there. But the time he spends deconstructing Acts and why very little of it is at all valid overwhelms Paul himself and his letters (which is what people want to get into, anyway). And then, when Wills does ge [...]

    Another fascinating book by the prolific Mr. Wills. Just in the introduction you learn that Paul's writings are closest documentation we have to the time of Jesus' life. Scholars believe that Jesus died approximately 30 CE and that Paul began following Jesus within 3-5 years of his death. The letters actually attributable to Paul, there are only 7, were written perhaps 25 years before Mark, the first written gospel, to 50 years before the last written gospel, John. The letters actual "Pauline wr [...]

    Dissapointing, oh well. I had not anticipated a work of CHristian apologetics and the author never clearly sets out his plan so as you read, you have to figure out his point. Me meanders quite a bit and the work is poorly organized. It is almost as if you kwalked in on the middle of a conversation and are not ever quite able to get completly clued in. As the author defends Paul as true heir of Jesus's teachings it becomes clear to the reader that the real issue is whether Paul wrote and believed [...]

    This little book delivers- that is, it presents an accurate overview of the light modern biblical criticism has to shed on Paul. He rightly takes the obvious step of focusing only on the indisputed letters of Paul (the pastorals are very unlikely to have been written by him). He does a solid job of clearly untangling sticky issues such as the relationship between Christ and the law and the role of the Jews as presented by Paul. Think that Paul was a misogynist? Well he clearly addresses one part [...]

    I am greatly appreciating Wills information about the parts of what we think of as *Paul* that are actually from Paul and those that are not his real writings or experiences. The lesser version makes more sense in terms of consistancy and speaks more to my beliefs. I look forward to What the Gospels Meant by the same author. I have finished ANOTHER book. Continued to really like Wills explanations of Paul. Returning this to my bible study group library. Will recommend it to all in the group, but [...]

    Interesting historical perspective of Paul and his writings. Since he wrote before most if not all of the other new testament writers his is closer to the time of Christ. Wills explores inconsistencies among the gospels and Acts and in Paul's writings. He finds that Paul's insights reflect Jesus' own teachings closely. He defends Paul against critics who label him as misogynistic, for instance. The author also analyzes Paul's work in relation to the times. Overall - an interesting read that is w [...]

    I was expecting to learn more about the life of Paul and his influence on Christianity. Instead, the author seemed more intent on discrediting Lukegoing so far as to say Luke's Gospel (written decades after Paul's letters) "replaced fact with fiction." ?? Have sought the opinion of my Pastor regarding much of what was written by this author.

    Only for the strong in faith. Aroused more questions than answers. Instead of explaining what Paul meant, this seemed to be more of a put-down of Luke. Did not enjoy it or find much useful except for the appendix that explained some Greek terms.

    As others have reviewed: meandering, not as well organized as What Jesus Meant. I came away from this book feeling less clear about what Paul meant. Perhaps that was the point? I doubt it.

    kind of terrible! disappointing. one-dimensional, lackluster defense against widespread critiques of Paul (which are difficult to oppose, but come on!).

    I was excited to read this book because I loved What Jesus Meant and have always struggled to accept much of what I believed Paul said, so I figured this book would help me finally understand Paul. I DO think I learned some really important historical factors that put Paul's words (and supposed words) in context, but I was quite disappointed with the second half of the book, from which I felt I gained no useful insights. I would recommend the introduction, chapters 1-2 (which discuss Paul's writ [...]

    Very rosy picture of Paul, but information/perspective that’s new to me and that seems to be accepted by at least some scholars.

    In this book by the questioning Roman Catholic, Garry Wills, many historical conceptions of Paul are discussed and questioned. Among them are Paul’s authority, whether he reinvented the message of Jesus or faithfully represented it, his thoughts toward women, and his thoughts toward Jews. Many people love Paul, and frankly many despise and distrust him. This book represents Wills’ attempt to understand him, rather than agree with historical critics like Pascal and Kierkegaard.Many have debat [...]

    My second Wills book. The book deserves a reader who is more knowledgeable than I am about the New Testament. My education occurred in Sunday school with an emphasis on literal reading of events. I didn't think I would venture above my intellectual level again (well, by reading Wills I do it all the time, otherwise ) but I was intrigued by the earlier book (Why Priests) and encouraged by a friend. So I grabbed the edge of the toboggan and plunged over the edge. What a ride in an entirely academi [...]

    Though I didn't find this book nearly as compelling as Wills' earlier work, "What Jesus Meant", there are very valuable insights here. Generally, Will's does a great job of casting a vision of Paul in light of his early, undisputed letters (1 Thess, Galatians, Philemon, Philippians, Corinthians & Romans). I really loved the chapter that surveyed the issues likely present in each of these communities, which Paul would have dealt with. This was a very helpful glimpse into the world of the text [...]

    I was thinking this would be similar to "What Jesus Meant," but this book’s bent is more historical and less theological. It’s mostly a defense of Paul and his letters, since Paul has been accused over the ages of misogyny, anti-Semitism, and generally corrupting the teachings of Jesus. Wills makes a few main points that I wasn’t aware of:- Only seven of the letters attributed to Paul were actually written by him (in the eyes of a consensus of scholars).- Although Paul’s travails are des [...]

    Listened to this in the car (which is quickly becoming my favorite commute activity rather than music or radio) and enjoyed it. It is a challenging and somewhat unorthodox approach to Paul - depending on your perspective and background. It is heavily influenced by modern scholarship surrounding Paul and the Bible. And, as others have noted, it is strongly anti-Luke. Unlikely that "orthodox" evangelicals and Catholics will find it persuasive but some might find it interesting depending on their w [...]

    Garry Wills does a good job addressing various misunderstandings of the texts from Paul, and creating an alternate image of Paul that is consistent and coherent. Paul's letters are the earliest written documents of the New Testament, and very important to understanding the life and development of the early church. Wills counters the notion that Paul represented a break from the teachings of Jesus of Nazareth, and instead presents the Apostle to the Gentiles as a reelable reflection of those teac [...]

    Very thought-provoking, but as with all apologetic books, I would have found it more satisfying if it had more citations and evidence and less guesswork. For example, I'm not sure how I feel about the author saying of a contradictory passage, "oh that was probably added at a later date by someone else, so we don't need to worry about it," but not explaining why it was thought to be inauthentic.By the end, I definitely felt more positive toward Paul, but also more disheartened about ever hoping t [...]

     Paul, simply.  In What Paul Meant, Garry Wills translates the authentic Pauline letters himself, and combines a careful translation of the koiné Greek with modern scholarship to suggest that Paul, who is the modern intellectual's favorite whipping boy as the man who distorted Jesus' message, is in fact a faithful interpreter of the Jesus of the Gospels.Read the full review at the Oregon Scribbler.

    At first, I was engaged in Will's defense of Paul and his explanation of the various ways in which our (mis)understanding of Paul's teachings are affected by the popularity of Acts. But after a few chapters of this, it started to curdle. moving from pro-Paul to anti-Luke. Maybe it's the current political clime and the weird objection to Obama as a candidate because he's appealing (?!?, um, yeah. Don't get it) -- Wills seems to feel the same way about Luke. People like Luke's books in the New Tes [...]

    Good balance of text-based criticism and historical considerations. Its succinctness is a virtue, yet a few claims (such as Wills' determinations as to which NT letters are authentically from Paul) I'm sure could have been further elaborated to be more conclusive or insightful. Overall, though, does a good job of stressing that Paul wasn't concerned with a "new religion" per se -- so was neither "anti-Jewish" nor "pro-Christian" -- but was simply concerned with "Jesus-Messiah" (for better or wor [...]

    This is an excellent book by Wills which could easily be kept on the shelf for easy reference. Wills has a conversational style to his writing, and he suffers no fools so he is interesting in what he has to say. He does a good job of laying out some of the basic teachings of Paul and dispelling mis-interpretations (e.g. Paul hates women). The gospel writer Luke takes a near continual beating from Wills because he distorts the history of Paul. Of course, Luke was not writing a historical document [...]

    I became interested in Gary Wills after reading his essays in The New York Review of Books where he writes often about the Catholic Church. In this book he debunks a lot of preconceptions about St Paul and his teachings. His chapter about Paul's view of women contradicts much of what Evangelicals and Catholics preach. I wish he could have gone a little more in depth on many of his subjects. He also argues that St. Paul was probably rolled in pitch and burned alive rather than being beheaded as c [...]

    Hurrah for good scholarship and good sense. Fascinating, helpful, and personally challenging. Wills lets Paul speak for Paul (rather than relying on Luke), and the result surprising. He also provides some much needed perspective on the Epistle to the Romans, which has long been squeezed and mutilated in order to fit into narrow, individualistic, and formulaic atonement theories ("the Romans Road").

    Fine defense of Paul--really changed my opinion. Apparently, according to Wills, he was not a misogynist, in fact was ahead of his times in egalitarian thinking. Fascinating discussion of transla-tion and mistranslation. I learned a lot, and found a spirituality I could relate to much more than the church as it often shows itself today. Anti-hierarchal, for one thing. And the revelation of love.

    I love Garry Wills-I wish we had more lay theologians like him who can pull the scholarship together.I discovered Paul shortly after my Mormon mission - I fell in love with him and named our first son for him. He is nothing short of amazing, and this short bio is an excellent intro - and busts a few myths along the way.

    Fascinating exploration of Paul and his letters. If you've every struggled with Paul's writings or the religious use of Paul's writings to justify onerous practices -- consider what Wills writes. It is illuminating and entirely rational. Fresh understandings and insights. I listened to audiobook that Wills himself reads. Listened through twice to make sure I got it. Highly recommend.

    Wills is concerned to "rehabilitate" St. Paul from damning perceptions which have accrued against him through misperception and lazy scholarship. He recalls to us that the Pauline writings preceed the authorship of the Gospels, and particularly of Luke-Acts, where he takes issue with the Lukan version of the Pauline biography. Good read, and a nice text for book studies.

    There is an acient heresy that has been perpetuated for centuries and is being recycled today. Some, including "Christians," believe that the Gosple that the Apostle Paul preached, subverted the Gospel of Jesus Christ. Garry Wills attempts to prove the opposite, but I did not come away thinking that Wills defended Paul well.

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