Dare We Hope That All Men Be Saved?

Dare We Hope That All Men Be Saved?

Dare We Hope That All Men Be Saved The Church s teaching on Hell has been generally neglected by theologians with the notable exception of Fr von Balthasar However what he has said has stirred controversy both in Europe and in the Un

  • Title: Dare We Hope That All Men Be Saved?
  • Author: Hans Urs von Balthasar
  • ISBN: 9780898702071
  • Page: 468
  • Format: Paperback
  • The Church s teaching on Hell has been generally neglected by theologians, with the notable exception of Fr von Balthasar However, what he has said has stirred controversy both in Europe and in the United States Here he responds in a clear and concise way, grounding his reflections clearly in Scripture Revelation gives us neither the assurance that all will be saved, nThe Church s teaching on Hell has been generally neglected by theologians, with the notable exception of Fr von Balthasar However, what he has said has stirred controversy both in Europe and in the United States Here he responds in a clear and concise way, grounding his reflections clearly in Scripture Revelation gives us neither the assurance that all will be saved, nor the certitude that any are condemned What it does require of us is the hope that all men be saved rooted in a love of Christ that reaches even into the depths of Hell.

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      Posted by:Hans Urs von Balthasar
      Published :2019-08-27T14:57:32+00:00

    717 Comment

    The premise of this book is fairly simple and plain and yet as with all things Balthasar it remains incredibly dense. Here are two quotes that capture a sense of what is being purported." love hopes all things (1 Cor 13:7). It cannot do otherwise than to hope for the reconciliation of all men in Christ. Such unlimited hope is, from the Christian standpoint, not only permitted but commanded" (213)."I would like to request that one be permitted to hope that God's redemptive work for his creation m [...]

    Hans Urs Von Balthasar narrowly avoids outright heresy by offering his book as mere speculation and possibility rather than an assertion.He is flatly contradicted not only by the witness of scripture but by the regula fidei (rule of faith); throughout all of historic Christian orthodoxy it has been agreed that hell is everlasting. So, based on this fact, we may not have a reasonable hope that all men may be saved.If this was the case, the implications for the meaning and purpose of the cross, th [...]

    I have to rave about the physical book. Ignatius Press turns out expensive, but incredibly well-made paperbacks. Their editions are printed on quality paper with excellent bindings.One of those books I will not read in the presence of food and drink.

    I am grateful for this masterpiece. von Balthasar is a patient and careful theologian who moves with agility through a remarkably difficult question. He balances the New Testament witness with that of the major players in Christian thought-history. What he does best of all is preserve the profound mystery of God’s salvation of all things both in protecting Goodness from spoil and calling all people unto himself.von Balthasar argues that while we cannot be presumptuous to assume that every huma [...]

    This is an excellent book that gives a Catholic lots to think about! It is very controversial and often misunderstood. It was a great first theological work for me to tackle and I found it easy to follow and understand. It definitely made me question where I had gotten certain ideas on hell and gave me a far greater hope than I had before. I would definitely recommend it!

    Hans Urs Von Balthasar with Joseph Ratzinger (Pope Benedict XVI), Karol Wojtyla (Pope John Paul II) and Henri Lubac were some of the most influential Catholic theologians of the 20th century. Balthasar was a close personal friend with Ratzinger and was appointed Cardinal by Pope JP II after Balthasar declined the appointment the first two times. Regrettably, Balthasar died before accepting the red hat after finally accepting the offer on Pope JP II's third, and most persistent, offer to Balthasa [...]

    This is a very well written, insightful, and thought-provoking essay, but it contains several deep-rooted errors. Those who are new to or have less knowledge of the Catholic faith should be cautious about reading it.

    I’d certainly call this a book of two halves—and personally, I preferred part two.The first part, *Dare We Hope*, is Von Balthasar’s exploration of the two stream of thought that Scripture and the Saints put before us about Universal Judgement and Universal Salvation. It’s a deep, though brief, survey and he obviously knows what he’s talking about; displaying a thorough knowledge of the musings and expositions of the Church Saints (which he focuses on more than the scriptures themselve [...]

    A book that tackles the logical questions that most people ask: why do people wish hell on others and should I ever think that toward another? I liked his answer but it was also a tough, academic-type read

    Hell - is it full, empty or half-empty (pessimism exists in hell, so we won't say half-full)? No one knows, and there is evidence on either side that suggests God will save all, and that many will perish. Have hope, that all will be saved!-God cannot be both merciful and just. Unless there is a healing punishment issued from sheer mercy-other fathers that were pro universalism include: clement of Alexandria, Gregory of Nyssa, didymus the blind, Jerome, Gregory nazianzen, maximus the confessor-"T [...]

    I had high hopes for this when I started it, because it was exactly this controversy that got Rob Bell in such hot water. But instead of examining the scriptures and their original Aramaic, Greek and Hebrew meanings like Bell, Balthasar part of his spent his time responding to critics of papers he had written on hell and part of his time examining the writings of church fathers. The later was useful, the former was not except to see how, like Bell, he had stirred the hornet's nest. Balthasar's c [...]

    A nice survey on the various opinions held by theologians throughout history as to the number of the elect/reprobate. Not too long of a read, but those of you pressed for time can get the gist of the argument by reading the much shorter "The Population of Hell" by Avery Dulles, SJ

    It strikes me as no coincidence that Pope Emeritus Benedict's emergence as the dominant force in Catholic theology coincided so closely with the failing health and death of Balthasar. This work is a brilliant defense of the possibility of universal reconciliation.

    An intriguing argument with some promise but lacking in serious exegesis. See my full review here: andthewordsbecamebooks.wordpre

    Even if you disagree with Balthasar's conclusions, read this book for the sake of the historical treatments of the various Church Fathers, if for nothing else.

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