Water Wars: Drought, Flood, and the Politics of Thirst

Water Wars: Drought, Flood, and the Politics of Thirst

Water Wars Drought Flood and the Politics of Thirst This is a wonderful book a wake up call of startling clarity and insight with a flood of facts and anecdotes that place the abstract into riveting human perspective I will never turn on the rap agai

  • Title: Water Wars: Drought, Flood, and the Politics of Thirst
  • Author: Diane Raines Ward
  • ISBN: 9781573222297
  • Page: 194
  • Format: Hardcover
  • This is a wonderful book, a wake up call of startling clarity and insight, with a flood of facts and anecdotes that place the abstract into riveting human perspective I will never turn on the rap again without thinking about where water comes from and where it goes Ken Burns, producer and director of the Civil War, Baseball, and Jazz documentaries The story of wate This is a wonderful book, a wake up call of startling clarity and insight, with a flood of facts and anecdotes that place the abstract into riveting human perspective I will never turn on the rap again without thinking about where water comes from and where it goes Ken Burns, producer and director of the Civil War, Baseball, and Jazz documentaries The story of water is complex, with roots as deep as civilization itself, but what we hear about it today is simple and stark the world s supply is in severe crisis Even when we re not confronted with alarming news of another drought, we re reminded of environmental changes and a growing world population that threaten to turn water into a matter over which wars will be fought Despite these urgent warnings, how many of us can say we understand the elemental forces that brought us to such a precarious state, or what we might do to get out of it Taking us on a world tour of the most hotly contested water climates, and introducing us to some of the most passionate advocates to emerge from them, Diane Raines Ward gives us a compelling account of where we ve come from, and where we need to go Why is the Fertile Crescent, historically one of the most lush places on earth, fast becoming a region of scarcity What do Dutch watermen, steeped in their centuries old, folkloric battle to protect their coasts, know about rising seas that we don t Why are certain environmentalists so eager to dismantle thousands of years worth of engineered solutions to distributing water And how is it that the very technology vilified by conservationists may be the only thing that can save us Through a narrative that s breathtakingly clear and filled with fresh insight, Ward answers these and other paradoxical questions, and gives us a bold perspective on a subject to which our fate is inextricably bound.

    • [PDF] Download ☆ Water Wars: Drought, Flood, and the Politics of Thirst | by ↠ Diane Raines Ward
      194 Diane Raines Ward
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      Posted by:Diane Raines Ward
      Published :2020-01-17T19:34:10+00:00

    756 Comment

    A good introduction to water issues, and one that focuses not just on privatisation issues or concerns over depleted resources, but looks as well at the "other" water wars--- the struggle to preserve places like the Netherlands and Venice, and that looks at irrigation projects not just as a priorienvironmental sins, but as efforts, even if misguided or badly done, to feed populations and sustain life. Rather light on technical or scientific background, but a balanced general introduction.

    Halfway through this book, I was pissed because 95% of it up to that point was an ode to the genius and hubris of the engineers who have had the chutzpah to build the world's biggest dams, thinking that they knew enough to control the waters of the world in an effort to prevent drought or flood to to enrich farmers. Thankfully, after that point the author started to admint that this hubris was wrong, that engineers failed to take into account the effects on the entire ecosystem, and that our wor [...]

    It was interesting to read this book right after 'Pillar of sand." There are lots of over-lapping ideas. This book is rather general and would have been improved with some maps and graphics. There is a lot of information about a large variety of water issues in the world. However, I think the title is pretty misleading - it just talks about issues and how people are working (or not) on solving the issues. I felt more like this book was a series of anecdotes of issues around the word than a cohes [...]

    More about water but the interesting thing, at least for me, is that Ms Ward did not rehash many of the well know battles - Cochabamba, bottled water, French multi-nationals, etc. The stories are all too familiar for people who follow water issues - poor planning, dams and water projects that do more harm than good, and flooding. Talking with experts and "normal" people alike make this book very readable and for those not immersed in the subject.

    I’m very glad I read this. While I felt I knew a little bit about what was going on with water in the world, the recent drought in California drew me to pick up this book. Wow. There is so much I didn’t know about water and it’s role in the world. From writing about drought in California, to dams in India, to flooding in Bangladesh, the author opened my eyes to both what is going on and what questions and issues need to be thought about in responding to these concerns.

    A quite interesting and well-written piece of nonfiction, I read this before the global warming thing really came to be in focus. Much of the information presented here about the use of water for energy amazed me, as well as the depressing facts about how much coal is still used in the world. Of course, it might be different to read it post-Inconvenient Truth- now that people talk about these things all of the time.

    Interesting to learn about the water conflicts that are plaguing the modern world. I first started reading this book in 2004 but finally picked it up again in 2009's a little outdated now in the context of global warming and such, but still worth your time.

    A wide overview of how humans have shaped Earth's waterways. While trying to make life better for humans, though, we have made a mess of the Earth's natural systems.

    Good read~living in the Great Lakes this is informative. Also read National Geographic's Water - a Thirsty World. Will make you think again

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