Revolution in The Valley: The Insanely Great Story of How the Mac Was Made

Revolution in The Valley: The Insanely Great Story of How the Mac Was Made

Revolution in The Valley The Insanely Great Story of How the Mac Was Made There was a time not too long ago when the typewriter and notebook ruled and the computer as an everyday tool was simply a vision Revolution in the Valley traces this vision back to its earliest ro

  • Title: Revolution in The Valley: The Insanely Great Story of How the Mac Was Made
  • Author: Andy Hertzfeld Steve Wozniak
  • ISBN: 9780596007195
  • Page: 320
  • Format: Paperback
  • There was a time, not too long ago, when the typewriter and notebook ruled, and the computer as an everyday tool was simply a vision Revolution in the Valley traces this vision back to its earliest roots the hallways and backrooms of Apple, where the groundbreaking Macintosh computer was born The book traces the development of the Macintosh, from its inception as an undThere was a time, not too long ago, when the typewriter and notebook ruled, and the computer as an everyday tool was simply a vision Revolution in the Valley traces this vision back to its earliest roots the hallways and backrooms of Apple, where the groundbreaking Macintosh computer was born The book traces the development of the Macintosh, from its inception as an underground skunkworks project in 1979 to its triumphant introduction in 1984 and beyond.The stories in Revolution in the Valley come on extremely good authority That s because author Andy Hertzfeld was a core member of the team that built the Macintosh system software, and a key creator of the Mac s radically new user interface software One of the chosen few who worked with the mercurial Steve Jobs, you might call him the ultimate insider.When Revolution in the Valley begins, Hertzfeld is working on Apple s first attempt at a low cost, consumer oriented computer the Apple II He sees that Steve Jobs is luring some of the company s most brilliant innovators to work on a tiny research effort the Macintosh Hertzfeld manages to make his way onto the Macintosh research team, and the rest is history.Through lavish illustrations, period photos, and Hertzfeld s vivid first hand accounts, Revolution in the Valley reveals what it was like to be there at the birth of the personal computer revolution The story comes to life through the book s portrait of the talented and often eccentric characters who made up the Macintosh team Now, over 20 years later, millions of people are benefiting from the technical achievements of this determined and brilliant group of people.

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      Posted by:Andy Hertzfeld Steve Wozniak
      Published :2019-06-22T12:13:36+00:00

    781 Comment

    I've read Isaccsons 'Jobs' biography and 'Fire in the valley' before. This book adds quite a bit more insight into the whole story of how the original Macintosh came into being between 1979 and 1985.Best of all, this book is not Steve Jobs-centric, like so many others are. While he plays a prominent role in the book, most of the essays in the book are about the people that did the dirty work to make the Macintosh happen, their struggles, their sacrifices and their camaraderie. This is a book abo [...]

    You look at the cover of this and read the title and it's obvious that this book is aimed at people who want to read about how Apple is just super awesome. Normally I don't think books like this are worth reading because it's, well, boring. I learned that this book would be worth reading because most of the stories in this book are available on folklore and this book is basically a printed and expanded version of those stories.Fortunately, it doesn't tell the story as "the clouds parted and beam [...]

    Loved this book. It was a most unusual and amazing memoir presented as a group of anecdotes during the development and rollout of the Apple Macintosh computer from the inside out. Given the recent bio on Steve Jobs and related bio on Steve Wozniak and many other related biopics, it was fascinating to read about the project work by the Mac team, how it came into existence and the many minds behind making this computer a real thing which went on to become a legend and foundation for Apple's early [...]

    Es curioso constatar la gran habilidad con la que se ha convertido en libro lo que en realidad es una página web. En cualquier caso, las 90 historias cortas que componen este libro te introducen de manera magistral en lo que fue la génesis del Macintosh y por tanto de la informática actual. Sobrecoge ver el paralelismo entre este proceso y lo que vamos conociendo de cómo se gestó el iPhone.

    Very nearly a five star review for this one, and I'd say that if you haven't read any of the stories on the brilliant folklore, you should add a star. I was depressed to discover while reading this book that I'd made my way through more of folklore than I'd thought while casually browsing - a visit over there is as bad as a night-long or TVTropes trawl for me - and as a result I'd read perhaps 90% of the material in the book. The fact that I enjoyed the book as much as I did is a testament to t [...]

    I loved this book! It was a great history of how the Mac came to be, and since I'm a Mac fan, I'm interested. Everyone knows the Mac was Steve Jobs' baby, and true technical people had to develop it and Andy Hertzfeld was one of the critical developers to put it together. This book is a mostly linear anecdotal history of the Mac, starting at the beginning and ending with the ejection of Jobs from Apple and the leaving of numerous key developers due to managerial incompetence. Pretty sad. Still, [...]

    Macintosh computer is the most iconic computer of all time, and probably one of the most significant consumer electronics products ever. The successors of the original Macintosh have remained aspirational products ever since, and Mac fans are oftentimes known for their cult-like admiration for their computers. One name that immediately comes to mind when Mac is mentioned is that of Steve Jobs, Apple cofounder and a mercurial and controversial visionary that has shaped Apple products for the most [...]

    Fantastic book, and you don't have to be a Mac or Apple "fanatic" to enjoy it. It is a collection of stories, nearly all by Andy Hertzfeld (but with several by other contributors), that describe the development of the Macintosh, as well as life at Apple Computer in the early '80s. The unique glimpses of Mac development, of the atmosphere at Apple, and of the people involved are quite interesting and even inspiring. I remember when the Mac came out, and being amazed at its graphic interface. (My [...]

    I love reading about the 70's/80's era of Silicon Valley and Apple, and Andy's essay format worked well. My only real critique is that most fans of the subject have already heard the majority of these anecdotes at Apple Computers. If you've read a Steve Jobs bio, or iWoz than the majority of the stories will sound like re-runs, although told from a different perspective. That said, I still enjoyed the book. Pictures of Andy's design notebooks were particularly inspiring, and make me wish I had e [...]

    Andy Hertzfeld's compilation of stories around the development of the Macintosh is an amazing piece of Silicon Valley history. It amazes me how much of the modern PC industry was driven by these crazy talented engineers.

    I have been programming computers since 1977, when my school got its first Commodore Pet. I have never owned an Apple device. I have used a Macintosh once for any extended period, back in 1989 when I took a Hypercard course at the School of Visual Arts. I have never gotten into (or frankly, even understood) the cult of Steve Jobs. I didn't think badly of him, and I didn't think well of him. I didn't think about him at all.This book makes it clear that Steve Jobs was a fucking asshole. This is a [...]

    In the mid-80's, the team of people that brought the Apple Macintosh to life were my heroes – guys like Steve Capps, Bill Atkinson, Susan Kare, Burrell Smith, and of course, Andy Hertzfeld. It's not just that I thought they were cool, I thought they were geniuses without peer. In a lot of ways, they were. I read all the stories about them in magazines and used and loved the Mac that was their creation. It was a great time for any kid interested in computers, the second phase of the personal co [...]

    You might not have heard of Andy Hertzfeld, but you’ve probably heard of the product that he co-created, the Apple Macintosh. Andy was on the team that built the system’s software, and one of the key contributors in the creation of the machine’s new user interface software, which signaled a radical change in the way that machines were designed and used.Revolution in the Valley, then, is Hertzfeld’s inside story of that exciting time in history when Steve Jobs’ innovation was at its gre [...]

    Very enjoyable collection of anecdotes by one of the original team that launched the Apple Macintosh. For Mac-aficionados and people interested in the birth of personal computing it's a really interesting read.

    This book is a series of vignettes about the development of the Mac, from the time that it was a wacky research project through the launch and then its eventual folding in with the Lisa team. The book is really a print version of the online archive of Mac development stories that Hertzfeld maintains. This explains the thing that first struck me about the book - it's written in hypertext, as much as a book can be written in hypertext. ;^) There are reference throughout to other vignettes that rea [...]

    Very enjoyable collection of anecdotes by one of the original team that launched the Apple Macintosh. For Mac-aficionados and people interested in the birth of personal computing it's a really interesting read.Originally written as a bunch of posts on the Mac Folklore website, there are a few bits of repetition which can be a teensy bit irritating when being read straight through. Also, some of the technical detail seemed both too elementary for people who know what's being talked about, but not [...]

    This book gives a great deal of insight into the creation of the original Apple Macintosh computer and into the inner workings of Apple from of the key designers. It also elucidates the best and worst characteristics of Steve Jobs, at least as he was from 1979 - 1985.The book is somewhat repetitive. It's a collection of anecdotes, not a cohesive, coherent narrative but is still quite revealing. The author often shows himself to have been quite naive, but that makes the book more realistic and be [...]

    I have not finished reading this book, but I could assure you that this is a beautiful book. As always, Apple-related products, people, or anything really are always elegant!This book is about Apple Macintosh development according to Andy Hertzfeld, one of the creator. What makes it interesting is that this book is full with inside stories and pictures. Beautiful pictures, I might add. That made me bought the book. It's a must have book for meW, parts of the book is available in Andy's web site [...]

    The Apple Macintosh revolutionized the personal computing industry. Behind the Macintosh was a top secret group of Apple's best and brightest engineers and designers. This book is a collection of anecdotes from members Macintosh team. They give insight into the life of a group of engineers whom, under the Steve Jobs dictatorship, worked day and night to make their vision come into reality. For the nerdy folks, this book has many gooey technical details. For Apple fans, this book blows open Apple [...]

    •Website becomes book. Mac folklore becomes access to a world where the boundaries between work and play temporarily dissolved. If you want a hint of the scent of the experience regarding the days when Silicon Valley was the startup capital of the world…of the days before the technocrats of efficiency triumphed over the artists of innovation…before magic devolved into "just jobs"—read this book…cuz that's as close as you're gonna get if you weren't actually there…•

    Practically everything in this book is available for free at folklore, but the stories are so revealing and entertaining that you won't mind. Plus, you get lots of illustrations and photos, along with some sidebars of new quotes and information. Fans of the Macintosh will definitely enjoy this peek behind the curtain. Note that the talk is on the technical side sometimes, which might bore the non-programmers out there.

    I love Apple. When I found folklore, I loved the stories of the early days of creating the mac written by the ones who did it. I got excited when it came out in a book, looking forward to more stories.Save the money. Skip the book and go to the website. It has it all, which made the book a terrible disappointment.

    Interesting and recommended to aspiring world-changersThis collection of stories is probably required reading for anyone who wants to make a dent in the world, no matter what profession. It will show you the struggles and the high & low points of working in something you love, and all the happiness and pride that entails working on it.

    This anecdotal account of the Macintosh team and how the Mac was created is, I think, the best book I've read about Apple Computer. Much of Walter Isaacson's book "Steve Jobs" was taken from these first-person accounts. In fact, the best parts of Walter Isaacson's book were taken from "Tevolution in the Valley".

    Really good read. Though I readily admit that some of the computer-specific stuff (detailed bits on programming, memory usage, etc.) were a bit over my head, I really enjoyed the book as a whole. The book really shined when it focused on basic human aspects: the stress, camaraderie, relationships, deadlines, competitiveness, and problem-solving. This is what I found truly compelling.

    A series of short stories about the original Macintosh team in the early 1980's. Most of the stories are recalled by Andy Hertzfeld, an engineer on the Macintosh team. A few of the stories are re-told by some of the other people on the team. Fun, entertaining, and imbues a sense of nostalgia despite the fact that I wasn't there.

    "Insanely Great" indeed.~ Gates just sat there coolly, looking Steve in the eye, before hurling back, in his squeaky voice, what became a classic zinger. “Well, Steve, I think there’s more than one way of looking at it. I think it’s more like we both had this rich neighbor named Xerox and I broke into his house to steal the TV set and found out that you had already stolen it.”

    I feel like I read most of this book on the folklore website. Probably; it's a subject I was very interested in. Revolution in the Valley provides a lot of first hand information about the genesis of the Macintosh.

    This book is pretty much the same collection as folklore, but if you are a mac fan, you'd like to also own the book version. It's always fascinating to read how a motivated team builds magic through the various anecdotes in the book.

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