Pink Flag

Pink Flag

Pink Flag In contrast with many of their punk peers Wire were enigmatic and cerebral always keeping a distance from the crowd Although Pink Flag appeared before the end of it was already a meta commenta

  • Title: Pink Flag
  • Author: Wilson Neate
  • ISBN: 9780826429148
  • Page: 424
  • Format: Paperback
  • In contrast with many of their punk peers, Wire were enigmatic and cerebral, always keeping a distance from the crowd Although Pink Flag appeared before the end of 1977, it was already a meta commentary on the punk scene and was far revolutionary musically than the rest of the competition Few punk bands moved beyond pared down rock n roll and garage rock, footbaIn contrast with many of their punk peers, Wire were enigmatic and cerebral, always keeping a distance from the crowd Although Pink Flag appeared before the end of 1977, it was already a meta commentary on the punk scene and was far revolutionary musically than the rest of the competition Few punk bands moved beyond pared down rock n roll and garage rock, football terrace sing alongs or shambolic pub rock and, if we re honest, only a handful of punk records hold up today as anything other than increasingly quaint period pieces While the majority of their peers flogged one idea to death and paid only lip service to punk s Year Zero credo, Wire took a genuinely radical approach, deconstructing song conventions, exploring new possibilities and consistently reinventing their sound THIS IS A CHORD THIS IS ANOTHER THIS IS A THIRD NOW FORM A BAND, proclaimed the caption to the famous diagram in a UK fanzine in 1976 and countless punk acts embodied that do it yourself spirit Wire, however, showed interesting ways of doing it once you d formed that band and they found compelling uses for those three mythical chords.

    • Best Read [Wilson Neate] ☆ Pink Flag || [Spirituality Book] PDF ☆
      424 Wilson Neate
    • thumbnail Title: Best Read [Wilson Neate] ☆ Pink Flag || [Spirituality Book] PDF ☆
      Posted by:Wilson Neate
      Published :2019-08-24T02:03:53+00:00

    356 Comment

    I keep reading these 33 1/3s and I love the concept but they don't always work. The reader brings one brand of understanding about the album and the author brings another, and if they line up, the book feels successful, and if they don't, it seems like someone's missing the point. I've tackled 33 1/3s on albums I know backwards and forwards, including all the backstory and history of the artist, and I've tried books on albums I didn't especially like by bands I don't know well and wanted to know [...]

    Wire is a band that I feel I need to get to know better. Back when I was just getting serious about my music, my father brought home an orphaned cassette that he found at work, (the post office) and it was Wire's 1987 album The Ideal Copy. (Incidentally, REM covered "Strange" from Wire's first album Pink Flag on their 1987 album Document). I remember liking Wire, but in those days I was too lazy and cheap to get backlogs of bands I liked (I had a lot of friends dubbing cassette tapes for me). I' [...]

    Really interesting if you're a crazed fan of Wire (like me.) Otherwise, it's probably gobbledygook. The tension between Colin Newman and Bruce Gilbert --more or less melody guy vs. noise guy-- was something I never picked up on, but it explains a lot about their music. And why Gilbert left the group.

    Many of the 33 1/3 books throw curveballls, but this is a fastball right down the line: a bit of band bio, a bit of recording detail, a solid track-by-track analysis, and a bit about the album's post-release history (including Elastica's, urm, homage to "Three Girl Rhumba"). Neate is amply readable and marries his own insights with a plethora of quotes from the band, their peers, and many of the musicians directly or indirectly inspired by Wire. I quibble a bit with the dismissive attitude to so [...]

    (Three and a half stars.) I've been dipping back into some of the old punk cornerstones lately, and as far as I'm concerned Wire's Pink Flag licks them all--Ramones, Singles Going Steady, Never Mind the Bollocks, Entertainment, even (forgive me, Joe) the Clash's first. While Wire does regroup occasionally to produce surprisingly strong new music that somehow keeps the old mystique fairly intact (I recently found that, while I was marching along the cold beaches of Duck with the family over sprin [...]

    If you love the album, you'll enjoy the book. I have a much deeper appreciation for what Wire intended and achieved with this landmark album. Wilson Neate deftly ties together contemporary interviews with the band, the engineer who recorded the album, and many of their contemporaries and peers to present the story of the album's creation, interpretation, and lasting influence. The whole book was quite good, but of special interest is the song-by-song breakdown of the album that shares the inspir [...]

    I would like to start by saying I am a humongous Wire fan. This book is just okay. I have heard that the 33 1/3 books are very inconsistent, and I do think this is one of the better models for writing about an album (Neate actually conducted interviews with the band members and producer and was fortunately able to come up with a lot of unknown information about the recording sessions, songs, etc). This certainly is better than the "let me tell you what this album means to me" 33 1/3 books. Excep [...]

    It may be heretical, but I'm not intimately familiar with Wire of Pink Flag. They've existed as an "important" band to me, but a little intimidating to approach. For whatever reason, I decided to jump into this book as my primer and I'm glad that I did. William Neate does a great job of explaining the dynamics of the band, why they're important, and how they still matter. It's also one of the most hilarious books I've read in the series with the band members bickering in quotes and giving charmi [...]

    My first 33.3 book! Thanks Amber. I am such a rock geek, and I love getting the details of how the album came together, the song-by-song analysis, and discussion of the album's impact from lots of different angles and perspectives. This was a good one to start with, because I can't say that I appreciated Pink Flag enough. It was rad to read the book and listen to the music concurrently. It made me fall in love with the record, and lots of the individual tunes. I still couldn't choose between Pin [...]

    This book was great, and I really enjoyed the early approach to the book, especially as I have a lot involved, personally, in the history surrounding the book. Sure, it got a bit tedious going song by song near the end, but it wasn't nearly as dull as some of the others in this book; it actually provided some good insight into the recording. At the end of this book, it made me love Wire even more.

    one of the better in the series. Good combo of fanboy stuff with interviews with the band that are enlightening. Especially if you love this album. And if you don't love this album you probably won't be interested.

    If you're a fan of the album you'll probably find some new insights into the tracks and how they were created but the writing can be a bit pretentious - something that happens a lot when writing about music.

    A good book,though Read and Burn is a better read. Some of the textual readings seem a bit of a stretch for me, but there are some revelations. Most importantly the songs are discussed not dissected, so they survive the process and listening pleasure is not impaired

    This is how rock journalism should be done. Neate is a reviewing virtuoso who should be proud of his insights, interviewing skills and song analysis.

    A fantastic entry in the 33 1/3 series about Wire's "Pink Flag," which must be the most meticulous and intelligent punk album of all time.

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