Stories Done: Writings on the 1960s and Its Discontents

Stories Done: Writings on the 1960s and Its Discontents

Stories Done Writings on the s and Its Discontents The s and s represent a rare moment in our cultural history music was exploring unprecedented territories literature was undergoing a radical reinvention politics polarized the nation and y

  • Title: Stories Done: Writings on the 1960s and Its Discontents
  • Author: Mikal Gilmore
  • ISBN: 9780743287456
  • Page: 215
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The 1960s and 1970s represent a rare moment in our cultural history music was exploring unprecedented territories, literature was undergoing a radical reinvention, politics polarized the nation, and youth culture was at the zenith of its influence There has never been, nor is there likely to be, another generation that matches the contributions of the artists of that tThe 1960s and 1970s represent a rare moment in our cultural history music was exploring unprecedented territories, literature was undergoing a radical reinvention, politics polarized the nation, and youth culture was at the zenith of its influence There has never been, nor is there likely to be, another generation that matches the contributions of the artists of that time period.In this poignant book, journalist Mikal Gil weaves a narrative of the 60s and 70s as he examines the lives of the era s most important cultural icons Keeping the power of rock roll at the forefront, Gil gathers together stories about major artists from every field George Harrison, Ken Kesey, Johnny Cash, Allen Ginsberg, to name just a few Gil reveals the truth about this idealized period in history, never shying away from the ugly influences that brought many of rock s most exciting figures to their knees He examines how Jim Morrison s alcoholism led to the star s death at the age of twenty seven, how Jerry Garcia s drug problems brought him to the brink of death so many times that his bandmates did not believe the news of his actual demise, how Pink Floyd struggled with the guilt of kicking out founding member Syd Barrett because of his debilitating mental illness As Gil examines the dark side of these complicated figures, he paints a picture of the environment that bred them, taking readers from the rough streets of Liverpool and its comfortable suburbs to the hippie haven of Haight Ashbury that hosted the infamous Summer of Love But what resulted from these lives and those times, Gil argues, was worth the risk in fact, it may be inseparable from those hard costs.The lives of these dynamic and diverse figures are intertwined with Gil s exploration of the social, political, and emotional characteristics that defined the era His insights and examinations combine to create a eulogy for a formative period of American history.

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    476 Comment

    Gilmore's book is a collection of articles on the cultural history of popular music, with a specific focus on the music made in the 1960s in America and England. Although he does include a good essay on Bob Marley, Gilmore's book does not concern itself with international developments in pop music. And although he tracks some groups--Led Zeppelin, Pink Floyd, the Grateful Dead--well into the Eighties, the book really is a musical history of the a single era, the Sixties, and of the music produce [...]

    All of these articles were originally written for Rolling Stone. As suggested by the subtitle of the book, Gilmore successfully conveys a feel for the cultural revolution in America known as "the Sixties", through his articles about music, musicians and other cultural icons.The first section--articles on Allen Ginsburg, Timothy Leary, the Grateful Dead and Jerry Garcia, Ken Kesey and the Haight-Ashbury section of San Francisco-is just about as good an introduction to the Sixties as you're likely [...]

    So, I picked this up from time to time over the course of several months--I wasn't highly interested in the book, but it was given to me by a friend who was sure I would like it. There were things in it that I really enjoyed--like Gilmore's analysis of the Beatles' "Sergeant Pepper's" album. I had heard the album so many times when I was very young, that it was odd to imagine what it was like to hear it when it first came out. I quite liked the entry on Johnny Cash, as it brought out some info a [...]

    This book is a collection of articles written by the author primarily for Rolling Stone magazine, often when a prominent figure from the 1960s died. From poets like Allen Ginsberg to that big fan of LSD, Timothy Leary, and including many musical talents, these articles really do provide at least an overview of pop culture in the 60s. In the introduction to the book, Gilmore tries to make the case that some of the creative leaps chronicled in the book wouldn't have been possible without drugs. Bu [...]

    Stories Done: Writings on the 1960's and Its Discontents by Mikal Gilmore (Free Press 2008)(780.92) "weaves a narrative of the 60's and 70's as he examines the lives of the era's most important cultural icons[the author] gathers together stories about major artists from every field." It's a book of wonderful mini-biographies: Allen Ginsberg, Timothy Leary, Jerry Garcia and the Grateful Dead, Ken Kesey, Haight-Ashbury, George Harrison, the Beatles, John Lennon, Johnny Cash, Bob Marley, Phil Ochs, [...]

    I brought this book with me on vacation, knowing that the friends I stayed with in Vermont would read it if I left it behind. Gilmore has a great finesse with biographical essays, and even though I am a longtime fan of both Johnny Cash and John Lennon, he was able to offer bits of new information or new perspective on their lives in each of their chapters. I know my friends were looking forward to the essays on Bob Marley, Timothy Leary, and Allen Ginsberg; and I asked them to pass the book alon [...]

    Gilmore does some good solid cultural criticism via rock writing here. The most interesting essays are the ones in which he examines the darkness at the center of our rock and roll icons of love and light; Jerry Garcia, The Beatles, Bob Marley, and finds that in many cases the fear, anger, disenfranchisement and sorrow was the black foundation that gave them the ability to convincingly reach the masses with a message of hope, faith and love even if these things (or perhaps because these things) [...]

    I really like the way Gilmore writes. He covers the 60s by telling of the complexities in a simple enough way to understand what it was like without making it cliche. Starting it with his essay on Ginsberg was brilliant. Each folds into the next and within each other. Just as it did in the 60s. Was very happy to just happen upon this book the day it came out in Costco of all places. They didn't know what to do with it, they had placed it next to the cook books. Could make some sense as reading t [...]

    Mikal Gilmore, who many might know as a longtime writer for Rolling Stone, has a gift with words. In this book, he brings us a collection of stories from figures that were central to the counterculture of the 1960s. Gimore does this without extravagance or excess flare. He doesn't attempt to make these people heroes or to build them up unnecessarily. He simply tells their stories and, in the process, teaches us about the era that influenced so much of our lives today.

    The first few stories I got the impression that he was just a groupie kissing ass to his heroes. However, the more I read, the more I got an understanding of an era that was in perpetual motion and some made it out of the maelstrom and others couldn't deal with surviving it. The book's one flaw is that there are no stories from the women of that era. I'm pretty pissed about that but maybe I should start doing research and write that book!

    This book took awhile for me to read. It has different chapters about different people from the 60's such as John Lennon, George Harrison, Jerry Garcia, Jim Morrison, Bob Marley, Johnny Cash etc I read and enjoyed certain chapters and got bored with other chapters of people I didn't know who they were. I read them and learned who they were but was alittle bored and not interested.

    What I learned from this book: that my beloved Beatles loathed being my beloved Beatles, that fans like me (I was 12 when I first saw them at Shea Stadium) depressed the hell out of them. I am so sorry, George. Otherwise: beautifully written mini-bios of musicians and other figures from the 60s. A refresher course of my youth.

    i think this was a really good book with different story's about different stars like (BOB MARLEY, BOB DYLAN, and HUNTERSOMPSON). I would like if every body in the world to read this wonderful book.

    A nice collection of obituaries; for people and for bands; by Gilmore. He's very insightful. And the books ends on an up note with chapters on two living legends; Dylan, and Leonard Cohen.

    Good re-cap of the men of the sixties.but the author gets stuck on each persons darkness. It starts to get repeative. The exception is the Leonard Cohen essay, which is darling.

    Oh, how I love Mikal Gilmore. I wish that there'd be a compilation of his writings on more recent bands, though. I've read all that I can bear about bloody Led Zeppelin & the Doors (hate the Doors).

    It filled a lot of gaps in my understanding ofthe music-makers of my children's generation,including some still important--or at least still of interest--to my grand-children.

    Just a book I picked up for research into my so called novel (which is 3 years into the writing and not very good, sigh!)

    Interesting perspectives on interesting bands and performers. Some repetition. Better than most music writing.

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