Homintern: How Gay Culture Liberated the Modern World

Homintern: How Gay Culture Liberated the Modern World

Homintern How Gay Culture Liberated the Modern World A landmark account of gay and lesbian creative networks and the seismic changes they brought to twentieth century culture In a hugely ambitious study which crosses continents languages and almost a

  • Title: Homintern: How Gay Culture Liberated the Modern World
  • Author: Gregory Woods
  • ISBN: 9780300218039
  • Page: 401
  • Format: Hardcover
  • A landmark account of gay and lesbian creative networks and the seismic changes they brought to twentieth century culture In a hugely ambitious study which crosses continents, languages, and almost a century, Gregory Woods identifies the ways in which homosexuality has helped shape Western culture Extending from the trials of Oscar Wilde to the gay liberation era, this boA landmark account of gay and lesbian creative networks and the seismic changes they brought to twentieth century culture In a hugely ambitious study which crosses continents, languages, and almost a century, Gregory Woods identifies the ways in which homosexuality has helped shape Western culture Extending from the trials of Oscar Wilde to the gay liberation era, this book examines a period in which increased visibility made acceptance of homosexuality one of the measures of modernity Woods shines a revealing light on the diverse, informal networks of gay people in the arts and other creative fields Uneasily called the Homintern an echo of Lenin s Comintern by those suspicious of an international homosexual conspiracy, such networks connected gay writers, actors, artists, musicians, dancers, filmmakers, politicians, and spies While providing some defense against dominant heterosexual exclusion, the grouping brought solidarity, celebrated talent, and, in doing so, invigorated the majority culture Woods introduces an enormous cast of gifted and extraordinary characters, most of them operating with surprising openness but also explores such issues as artistic influence, the coping strategies of minorities, the hypocrisies of conservatism, and the effects of positive and negative discrimination Traveling from Harlem in the 1910s to 1920s Paris, 1930s Berlin, 1950s New York and beyond, this sharply observed, warm spirited book presents a surpassing portrait of twentieth century gay culture and the men and women who both redefined themselves and changed history.

    • Best Read [Gregory Woods] ↠ Homintern: How Gay Culture Liberated the Modern World || [History Book] PDF ↠
      401 Gregory Woods
    • thumbnail Title: Best Read [Gregory Woods] ↠ Homintern: How Gay Culture Liberated the Modern World || [History Book] PDF ↠
      Posted by:Gregory Woods
      Published :2019-08-25T14:18:26+00:00

    919 Comment

    For anyone whose idea of gay history begins with Stonewall, this is a massive, wide-ranging tour of late 19th and 20th century gay and lesbian cultural life up through the years of political activism and the HIV/AIDS crisis. If you had ever been exposed to the myth that "there just weren't gay people" at a certain time, something I certainly heard from older adults in my youth, this dispels that notion. Just as well it fills in the gaps thoroughly, providing a glimpse at popular, literary, polit [...]

    I would have given Homintern two stars, but added one for the breathtakingly impressive volume of research and information. However, the problem seems to me that little of the vast content reveals what the subtitle promises: 'How Gay Culture Liberated the Modern World.' Instead there's way too much of who did what and to whom — the 'who' in question seems like a litany of naming for name-dropping's sake — and not enough of exactly how they or their lifestyles, attitudes, or work influenced t [...]

    Terrific amount of research - hence the three stars. Quite difficult to read straight through, due mainly to the sheer density of facts & names on the page at any one time - but this is definitely a book to keep and use as a work of reference. The subtitle feels like a marketing hook tacked on by the publisher - the book doesn't concern itself with the 'how' so much as the very copious 'what'. Explication, not analysis.

    Gregory Woods’ Homintern: How Gay Culture Liberated the Modern World is an interesting look at some of the queer people and communities who have undeniably influenced modern cultural development, from Oscar Wilde to Yukio Mishima, and how these artists and communities have been viewed. Woods begins by defining his idea of the Homintern (a play on the international Communist organisation, Comintern, which advocated world communism): “The Homintern is the international presence of lesbians and [...]

    On the one hand, based on the number of pages I bookmarked, I clearly found quite a few passages that contained interesting thoughts or opinions (mostly of those the author is quoting than his own analysis) or references to authors that I hadn't heard of.However, overall, it's an overly dense and disappointing read. If nothing else for the simple reason that it doesn't do what is says on the tin.His definition of 'culture' is very narrow. The bulk of the book is a painstaking portrait of the sex [...]

    Free early reviewer copy. This book is very hard to classify. It’s a gossipy, tidbit-strewn account of how gay, bisexual, and lesbian people influenced culture, and each other, across Europe and Russia and with a few jaunts to the US and the Mediterranean, from roughly Oscar Wilde’s time through about the 1960s. In other words, it's a grab bag of high culture creators. Mostly the book focuses on literary works, dance, and painting/sculpture, with a bit of film. Woods argues that gays and les [...]

    When I stumbled upon this book, I was really looking forward to reading it despite other reviews. It was indeed very text heavy, and quite wordy- which was disappointing. Overall, there were some insightful tidbits of queer history that made up for the wordiness.

    This book was a massive, gorgeous undertaking--the kind of queer cultural history I've been searching for over *years* but hadn't found yet. If you're looking for a history of queer rights' movements, this isn't going to be it. But if you're looking for a detailed history of various cultural scenes--gay Berlin/Paris, queer exiles in Tangier, etc--then this is the volume for you. The first portion of the book was quite overwhelmingly western and white, which was rectified towards the end of the b [...]

    This was a disappointing read. The subtitle would lead the reader into thinking that this would be an analysis of what constituted gay culture and how this culture spread from the gay ghetto into the mainstream of world, or western at least, culture. Instead, what we get is a snapshot of the activities of, mostly, gay men and some lesbians who were active in the narrow worlds of Literature, "The Arts" and a few related fields. There is no attempt to analyse their impact on the modern world beyon [...]

    A very well written, fascinating and enjoyable read about how Homosexuality affected High Culture in Europe in the first third of the 20th century, focusing especially on European Modernism before the great movement of refugee Artists and intellectuals to America in the 1930's and 40's. Some great gossip, and interesting ideas- for example about how the Russian Ballet homosexualized ballet itself and created a public space for male homosexuality. I do think that the claims of the title are not f [...]

    Though a bit lacking in terms of insight and incisive commentary, Woods offers an entertaining collection of anecdotes and cultural surveys concerning homosexual artists/writers/poets in the late 19th and 20th centuries. A good jumping off point for further exploration.

    There are some excellent sections in the book but also some that are dull; an uneven book. It doesn't really live up to its sub heading but it is an enjoyable, and also frustrating read.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *