The Railways: Nation, Network and People

The Railways: Nation, Network and People

The Railways Nation Network and People Britain s railways have been a vital part of national life for nearly years Transforming lives and landscapes they have left their mark on everything from timekeeping to tourism As a self contain

  • Title: The Railways: Nation, Network and People
  • Author: Simon Bradley
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 400
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Britain s railways have been a vital part of national life for nearly 200 years Transforming lives and landscapes, they have left their mark on everything from timekeeping to tourism As a self contained world governed by distinctive rules and traditions, the network also exerts a fascination all its own.From the classical grandeur of Newcastle station to the ceaseless trBritain s railways have been a vital part of national life for nearly 200 years Transforming lives and landscapes, they have left their mark on everything from timekeeping to tourism As a self contained world governed by distinctive rules and traditions, the network also exerts a fascination all its own.From the classical grandeur of Newcastle station to the ceaseless traffic of Clapham Junction, from the mysteries of Brunel s atmospheric railway to the lost routines of the great marshalling yards, Simon Bradley explores the world of Britain s railways, the evolution of the trains, and the changing experiences of passengers and workers The Victorians private compartments, railway rugs and footwarmers have made way for air conditioned carriages with airline type seating, but the railways remain a giant and diverse anthology of structures from every period, and parts of the system are the oldest in the world.Using fresh research, keen observation and a wealth of cultural references, Bradley weaves from this network a remarkable story of technological achievement, of architecture and engineering, of shifting social classes and gender relations, of safety and crime, of tourism and the changing world of work The Railways shows us that to travel through Britain by train is to journey through time as well as space.

    • Best Read [Simon Bradley] ✓ The Railways: Nation, Network and People || [Children's Book] PDF ½
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      Posted by:Simon Bradley
      Published :2019-06-16T13:06:27+00:00

    482 Comment

    BOTWbbc/programmes/b06qhlhxDescription: A magnificent account of Britain's railways and how track and carriage united a nation.This series of readings includes an exploration of many aspects of the railway revolution, such as the challenges of 'railway time', the nuances of first, second and third class, the dificulties of lighting and heating, passenger comfort, what to eat when travelling and the history of refreshment stops and the commercial opportunities they brought - including the establi [...]

    From BBC Radio 4 - Book of the Week:A magnificent account of Britain's railways and how track and carriage united a nation.This series of readings includes an exploration of many aspects of the railway revolution, such as the challenges of 'railway time', the nuances of first, second and third class, the dificulties of lighting and heating, passenger comfort, what to eat when travelling and the history of refreshment stops and the commercial opportunities they brought - including the establishme [...]

    I enjoyed this book. It is aimed at the general reader with an interest in railways but not anything excessive with regards to trainspotting. Simon Bradley writes entertainingly about the growth of railways in Britain and their effect on the life and times of the people. He traces the effects of railway growth on society, the economy, the landscape and pretty well anything else you can think of. He has cited a very wide range of sources and writers on the influence and effect of railways on life [...]

    A puerile man would make some joke here about the hardback version of this book having a dust-anorak (and probably a high viz one at that) instead of a jacket, but such a thought would, of course, never occur to a mature reader such as myself.Such levity is, however, out of place. Simon Bradley has clearly undertaken exhaustive research and produced a marvellous book. I can imagine some readers’ eyes rolling at the ‘exhaustive research’ and immediately imagining a dry and dusty tome, redol [...]

    Good in parts but much to long and with many parts that would only be really interesting to railway fanatics.

    This is one of the books I was reading for my Downton Abbey based interests. I haven't gotten out of the first episode of the first season yet. I wanted to learn about the English telegraph system, labor issues, and, of course, the railroads. So, part of my journey was reading this book. It is a very thorough account of English railway history. It does cover more time than I was interested in but any student of social history in England will find this fascinating and useful. He brings in a lot o [...]

    It's not often I finish a long and sprawling work of nonfiction and feel the same sense of loss that I might with a good novel. This was so well-written, engaging and original that I feel sad to have finished it.

    A fascinating and comprehensive history of the railways and their effect upon British society over the last two centuries.

    Near perfectA useful addition to anyone's library of railway books. More photos and maps would have made this perfect. A moving history of a curiously still present railway age.

    As I started in on this hefty tome, the feeling crept over me that I was, in fact, reading an expanded, more scholarly version of Brian Hollingsworth's classic The pleasures of railways: a journey by train through the delectable country of enthusiasm for railways, a slim paperback from 1983 that covers a similar breadth of railway minutiae and esoteric avenues of delight. Case in point: Bradley's chapter on sleeping cars is titled "And so to bed". Hollingsworth's is called "Sleeping in the Sleep [...]

    Hard going, very detailed, but well worth it. Almost a socual history of England, should be read in this way, rather than a straight forward history of the railways.

    This is quite a long book, but worth it for anyone interested in the history - especially the social history - of a major economic and social force. The railways transformed Britain in a few years, enabling the faster and cheaper transport of goods all over the country (and via ports to others). Bradley's style is easy and readable, and he avoids dry accounts of the economics and technical history. Instead, he illustrates his points using interesting, shocking, or amusing stories of the people i [...]

    This is a phenomenal book and one of the most detailed and engaging social histories I have read in a while. We sadly tossed a collection of railway books from the early twenties last year because they were beyond preservation; but those books, inherited from long-dead English relatives, sparked my interest in steam engines. Though not a trainspotter, I delight in travelling by rail; and this volume celebrates the place the British railway has had in forming, influencing and expressing society. [...]

    Almost over-full but well-shepherded thematic compendium of information and commentary on Britain's railways. Gossip and scholarship go hand in hand, and the engineering and accounting never loses sight of the humanity.

    I learnt lots of new facts in this book, and it's well worth a read. I preferred the second section which was a bit more of a survey of various aspects of railway history, whereas the first section focused on the 1850s and dragged a little bit for me. I would recommend it though.

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