Tick Bite Fever

Tick Bite Fever

Tick Bite Fever Tick Bite Fever is the unconventional memoir of a very unconventional childhood In the early Seventies Dave Bennun s family transplanted themselves from Swindon to the wilds of Kenya His father who

  • Title: Tick Bite Fever
  • Author: David Bennun
  • ISBN: 9780091897437
  • Page: 205
  • Format: Paperback
  • Tick Bite Fever is the unconventional memoir of a very unconventional childhood.In the early Seventies, Dave Bennun s family transplanted themselves from Swindon to the wilds of Kenya His father, who was a doctor, had lived in Africa before but had felt it expedient to leave when the South African government realised he was carting explosives around in the boot of his caTick Bite Fever is the unconventional memoir of a very unconventional childhood.In the early Seventies, Dave Bennun s family transplanted themselves from Swindon to the wilds of Kenya His father, who was a doctor, had lived in Africa before but had felt it expedient to leave when the South African government realised he was carting explosives around in the boot of his car for the ANC For Dave, Kenya was bemusingly new It would be his home for the next 16 years.In Kenya, the childhood memoir takes on a rather surreal tone On the way home from school, closed because a pair of lions are padding around the playground, Dave is mugged by baboons Meet Dave s favourite pet Achilles, the almost indestructible dog Find out about Nairobi snow and the national radio station that only has three records And read about Dave and his Dad spending happy Sunday afternoons being chased by a herd of elephants Enchantingly funny, Tick Bite Fever is a tale of the fading innocence of childhood, miles ahead of the competition.

    • ☆ Tick Bite Fever || ✓ PDF Download by Ö David Bennun
      205 David Bennun
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      Posted by:David Bennun
      Published :2019-04-24T01:38:54+00:00

    321 Comment

    I found the title very apt as I was finishing the book while trying my best not to scratch my gazillion bed bug bites complements of a short holiday in Mozambique.The book contains stories of David’s growing years in Zambia and KenyaI think any memoir is a balancing act between stories that only YOU find interesting versus stories that others will find readable. The author does have a gift for taking little anecdotes and stretching them into amusing stories so some of the tales were genuinely [...]

    I really wanted to enjoy this book, especially as I lived in Kenya for twenty years and looked forward to taking a trip down memory lane.The first part I did find amusing. David was the kid from hell, always getting into trouble. The family's camping trips were also a good read, and I loved his doctor father's enthusiasm for playing around with old vehicles and his ability to get the family out of some of the predicaments into which he got them.However, I felt that the tone of the book changed d [...]

    Has to be the funniest autobiography Ive ever read. Embarrasing to read in public as people stared at me the whole as I couldnt stop laughing. Not very informative about africa, its not that kind of book, its just funny and about how a child feels growing up. I dont understnd why people give a bad review of a book based on thier own misunderstanding of what they should have expected to learn from it!

    I can only read so many books about children growing up in Africa, and this wasn't one of the good ones. Writing from the perspective of a child, as an adult, grows tired very quickly and there wasn't enough tension or comedy in this to move it along. Not a spectacular contribution to the genre--more like dinner party anecdotes than strong, confident writing. (Of course, since I read Jane Bussman's Worse Date Ever, my standards are through the roof.)

    I found this book lying on the floor in my hayloft, so it looked interesting. In reading, I have not been disappointed, it's made me laugh out loud, even when I'm exhausted. David's stories about growing up, his family's dis-functions, combined with bits and pieces that are unique to Nairobi made it worthwhile. The experiences were funny, painful and regular. It's not a change your world type of book, but definitely makes you leave yours for a moment and laugh.

    I grew up in Kenya at roughly around the same time as the author (mid-seventies to late 80s), so much of the book is so familiar. It's like swapping stories with an old friend--except only one person is doing the talking. Though the book is sometimes disjointed and doesn't "flow," it lends to the charm of the "hey, let me tell you about this one time" feeling I got reading it. And Bennun is funny; I giggled more than once.

    I've read a bunch of "white person in Africa" memoirs, and this was one of the better ones. Funny without being contrived, it also provides interesting snippets of life in 1970s Africa.I think he overstated what a terrible child he was, and I could have done without an isolated, racist dig against the Middle East that was supposed to pass for humor. But by and large he is both funny and self-aware about his place in post-colonial Africa.

    Most of it was amusing, except for the first chapters covering his toddler years. He was quite an annoying brat, something he appears to be proud of. The rest of the book is comprised of anecdotes of his childhood until he goes off to college. It's surprising to me that he has never returned to Kenya!

    It was an interesting book, about David Bennun when he grew up in Africa: I think Zambia, and Kenya. He was near the death many times. Many nice stories about his neighborhood, safaris and from his school. If you don't know how it is growing up in Kenya/Zambia, you should really read this book. BTW, Bennun as one of the most hilariuos writers in Kenya!

    This book has plenty of laugh-out-loud moments, that is for sure, however by the time I was a third of the way through, I found myself tiring of the author's self-deprecating humor and wishing for deeper character development. That said, it was a fun read with fantastic settings, and it put me right there in Kenya with the author.

    Highly disappointing account of growing up in Kenya. I'm not sure that Bennun had much to say that others before and more after haven't already spoken to about living/growing up in Africa. Parts were funny and I think as an individual Bennun is probably a fun person to speak with, but the book just wasn't that great.

    This is a well written book with considerable humor throughout. Unfortunately I had hoped to learn about Kenya from the book, and in that it failed. Only a few minor bits of information were scattered throughout the book. If you want to be entertained, read it. If you want to learn something, read something else.

    Whimsical and light. But any "expat" growing up in Africa is going to have tons of quirky stories. If I were searching for a really funny, revealing story of being a kid in Africa, I would keep on looking past this one.

    David Bennun's memoir of his childhood in Kenya was highly entertaining. Tick Bite Fever takes place in Africa in the early 70s until David leaves to attend university in England, his original family home. This book provided a great way to lighten up a cold and dark winter weekend.

    I'm a sucker for hilarious books, and this one made me laugh out loud. Of course, I enjoyed reading about Kenya in the 70's, but what really makes this book a gem is the author's way with a clever turn of phrase and his self-deprecating humor.

    I really enjoyed this book. I laughed out loud so many times that I think quite a few people at my college now think I'm crazy. Well written and fun to read.

    This was THE worst book I have read in a long time. Not funny, not interesting, very, very dull. Apparently it was meant to be a comedy. Do not waste a second on it.

    If you like Bill Bryson's travel memoirs or Calvin Trillin, you'll enjoy this tale of a young Brit growing up in Africa. A laugh-out-loud fish-out-of-water tale.

    Absolutely loved it. Tears of laughter. If you've spent a reasonable amount of time in east or Southern Africa as a foreigner this will resonate.

    I giggled and snickered with every page. This is a great book. The stories are whimsical and fun. I wanted to attend school with him and walk his steps. Great escape!

    Advertised as incredibly funny. With those expectations, it is a let down. However, if you enjoy a humorous story about an African childhood, it is worth the read.

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