Everywhere Antennas

Everywhere Antennas

Everywhere Antennas A poetic novel that plumbs the depths of self doubt and technological fatigueJulie Delporte s Everywhere Antennas is a deeply affecting sparely constructed novel equal parts Walden and The Bell Jar

  • Title: Everywhere Antennas
  • Author: Julie Delporte Helge Dascher
  • ISBN: 9781770461543
  • Page: 222
  • Format: Paperback
  • A poetic novel that plumbs the depths of self doubt and technological fatigueJulie Delporte s Everywhere Antennas is a deeply affecting, sparely constructed novel, equal parts Walden and The Bell Jar Told in the first person, it offers diary like entries from an anonymous narrator who is undergoing a nervous breakdown and struggling to hold together a failing relationshipA poetic novel that plumbs the depths of self doubt and technological fatigueJulie Delporte s Everywhere Antennas is a deeply affecting, sparely constructed novel, equal parts Walden and The Bell Jar Told in the first person, it offers diary like entries from an anonymous narrator who is undergoing a nervous breakdown and struggling to hold together a failing relationship In soft, flowing colored pencil, Delporte shows her narrator coming to terms with a rare and misunderstood sensitivity to the radiation emitted by the televisions, cell phones, and computers that permeate urban life On each page a few words are paired with an image or two, conveying a moment or a thought simply but effectively Over the course of the book, the anonymous narrator moves from place to place, looking for solutions to her melancholy in the countryside via isolation and in the city with friends, sometimes turning to medication for answers Throughout, her emotional and intellectual landscape receives as much attention as her physical surroundings.Everywhere Antennas is the portrait of a woman caught in the margins, struggling to balance the demands of technology and modern life with the need to find meaningful relationships and work Roughly hewn figures, sketched in pencil crayon on brightly contrasting backgrounds, populate the pages of this flowing, emotive work With Everywhere Antennas, Delporte proves herself a master craftswoman of heartbreakingly personal, beautifully literary graphic fiction.

    Everywhere Antennas Delporte, Julie, Dascher, Helge Everywhere Antennas is the portrait of a woman caught in the margins, struggling to balance the demands of technology and modern life with the need to find meaningful relationships and work. Everywhere Antennas by Julie Delporte May , Everywhere Antennas is the portrait of a woman caught in the margins, struggling to balance the demands of technology and modern life with the need to find meaningful relationships and Everywhere Antennas Drawn Quarterly Everywhere Antennas is the portrait of a woman caught in the margins, struggling to balance the demands of technology and modern life with the need to find meaningful relationships and work. Everywhere Antennas Walmart Walmart Everywhere Antennas is the portrait of a woman caught in the margins, struggling to balance the demands of technology and modern life with the need to find meaningful relationships and work. Antennas Everywhere Semiconductor Engineering Antennas Everywhere As devices are equipped with communications capabilities, the number of antennas will explode That creates new challenges on every level. Ericsson refines antenna stripe technology to improve Mar , We believe the next step will be to distribute antennas everywhere and we re already pushing antenna development into the size of a matchbook.

    • ä Everywhere Antennas || ☆ PDF Read by ☆ Julie Delporte Helge Dascher
      222 Julie Delporte Helge Dascher
    • thumbnail Title: ä Everywhere Antennas || ☆ PDF Read by ☆ Julie Delporte Helge Dascher
      Posted by:Julie Delporte Helge Dascher
      Published :2020-03-11T12:55:05+00:00

    324 Comment

    This is sort of minimally done, sketching with some colorful watercolor touches, a fictional journal of a young woman who seems to be quite depressed, certainly unstable, though she thinks she has the answer to why she is suffering: Electromagnetic radio waves (transmitted via antennas), based on something she hears on the news. Everything is falling apart for her; her boyfriend helps her get meds for depression, but this relationship not surprisingly is tenuous.Delporte does the lettering in a [...]

    This is a beautiful, minimal book about a girl suffering from a variety of mental health issues. She's centered it upon being unable to function well in a world of antennas and radioactivity and chooses to live a simple life off-grid. The art is outstanding and dreamy, and the writing translates quite well. This story really resonated with me, but less on the radioactivity sensitivity and more on how the main character -- who is unnamed -- suffers from a really debilitating depression that doesn [...]

    Un autre bel album de Julie Delporte, tout en retenue & en délicatesse, avec une fébrilité très douce qui anime joliment les pages. On suit la narratrice alors qu'elle navigue à travers les effets d'une sensibilité douloureuse face au monde moderne & à ses radiations électromagnétiques -- ce qui se révèle étrange, mais surtout très solitaire. L'histoire est lente & triste ; l'émotion toujours subtile, dosée. L'ambiance est feutrée & on a cette impression particuli [...]

    Everywhere antennas by Julie DelporteJulie Delporte’s Everywhere Antennas is a simple, spare and intensely evocative. Told in the first person, Everywhere Antennas offers diary-like entries from an anonymous narrator who is undergoing a nervous breakdown and struggling to hold together a failing relationship. In addition, the narrator's feeling that the electrical fields and antennas of everyday life are impacting negatively on her psyche prevails throughout the slim volume. The choice of colo [...]

    Very minimalist but brightly coloured in coloured pencil (aside for one section done in just regular pencil). The narrator is not feeling at all well and comes to decide that it's because she is sensitive to electrical fields. She spends time in the natural world but separated from others and the only way to keep in touch is to use said fields.It's told in diary form and certainly makes you appreciate and hate isolation at varying points. I'm not sure how I feel about the whole electromagnetic s [...]

    I fell in love with this book, those pencil illustrations and the story. It kind of sticked with me.For more : patriciavpicard.wix/lesbel

    Such a beautiful, aesthetically honest (one commenter wrote "guileless") book. Gentle, with artwork that knows the page effortlessly. I look forward to any other work by Julie Delporte.

    Very unique, minimalist sketchbook/journal of a young woman dealing with mysterious health problems she eventually discovers are due to sensitivity to electromagnetic radiation. It's very fragmented and short, yet well-written. It addresses human relations to technology, modernity, and other people. Coincidentally at the time of reading, I have been dealing with my own chronic health problems and could relate to the anxiety and loneliness experienced by the protagonist.

    About EM sensitivity and trying to find a quiet place in the world. The artist acknowledges specific colored pencil colors at the end of the book.

    *A Little Spoilerish - - Read after you've read if you like to go in blind to plot and themes*3.7 StarsJe vois des antennes partout is the original French version of an English-translated graphic novel that won some awards in 2014Is this fiction? It seems at least semi-autobiographical. What it does seem to be, is the account of a young woman who is depressed and sick, both of which are caused either literally by electromagnetic radiation from cell phones and wi-fi and such, or figuratively by t [...]

    Everywhere Antennas is lush with beautiful artwork, but to me lacked a coherent plot line.Our unnamed narrator is struggling to find purpose in her life, struggling to overcome terrible headaches and debilitating depression. After stumbling upon an article online she becomes certain that her headaches, nausea and depression are being caused by radiation emitted by telephone wires, computers and television. She takes to the countryside, couch hopping from one secluded spot to the next. Over the c [...]

    2.5 stars;I picked this up randomly at my library and I REALLY wanted to like it, but this graphic novel just fell really flat for me. First and foremost, I found it confusing. Sometimes the author wrote little snippets of her thoughts - like a diary - but the format didn't work for me. The timeline and locations and what exactly was going on (aside from her mental health struggles) came off as really unclear. While I could feel and relate to the main character and her struggles with technology [...]

    I wasn't sure whether this was memoir or fiction--it's written in a straight-up, on-the-nose style that makes me think memoir, but I haven't seen any clear indication either way. The story is pretty simple. An unnamed narrator copes with a rare sensitivity to the electromagnetic spectrum, which eventually drives her to live off the grid. There's very little text, and the art is done in bright pencil crayon on white paper, which gives things an interestingly cheerful, dreamy, twee look in contras [...]

    Lovely, affective, guileless, but slight. Beautiful if amateurish drawings complement diary-like text of a woman having some sort of breakdown. She marks electromagnetic fields as the culprit and withdraws to contemplate Thoreau, her relationships, and her future. She drifts. She dreams. I thought it should be longer in order to be a better story. It slides past interesting points about what withdrawing from modernity would mean in this day & age, what her relationships are like with the peo [...]

    Well the art is beautifulThere's no way I can review this without betraying my skepticism about electromagnetic hypersensitivity. While peoples' symptoms certainly are real, I am so doubtful of the cause being electromagnetism. I'll stop there, because this is a book review. As a book, it's an interesting and very sympathetic depiction of a young person dealing with chronic illness and depression. Two things I care a lot about! Even so, I did not like it.

    This was a nice story. The only problem I have with this story however, is that the story was a little difficult to follow sometimes.I understood the main point of the story, but at certain times, the story jumped to another point of view or another character's life and I wasn't able to understand where the shift took place, or even why it was placed there…BUT other than that I really like how everything was drawn and I LOVED how the author changed up the colours on every single page in order [...]

    This left me wanting more. A little clarification on what was happening in the book (especially who the people in her life are.) When a single initial appears with no clarification as to who the person is: gender, age, anything, then two pages later they have a "devastating" breakup, it's hard to connect. The illustrations are beautiful, and the color pencil combinations are remarkable. The more sketch parts and the more focused drawings are both skilled, but again, some coherence, a better flow [...]

    I don't know if it's the disarming use of coloured pencils for the text and drawings or that I completely distrust people who are afraid of radio waves and ended up completely sympathizing and worrying about the narrator but this book did something to my brain. It's sad, wistful and brave and without claiming to be an authority on any topic, has you rethink what you know about the woods, the wires, love, friends, the space in our minds and the noise in the world. I really, really, really liked i [...]

    The colored pencil and watercolor art (with a smattering of pencil) created such beautiful tones in this book. I would read more Delporte just for that. At first I felt a little annoyed by the narrator's malaise and paranoia, but as the book progressed, I began to sympathize more with the alienation that seems perhaps especially relevant to people in my weird little sliver of a not-quite-Gen-X, not-quite-Millennial generation.

    "They're part of the burden of a modernity we haven't chosen."A young woman struggling with depression and anxiety quickly identifies electromagnetic radiation as a cause for her illness. Along the way her relationships deteriorate.Most of all this is a reaction against technology. She references Walden which is awesome. There are a handful of translation errors but it's not a major concern. I wished it was longer.

    While the author is not Canadian, she was in Canada when she wrote it, so I consider it a component of CanLit ;). The book is a thoughtful portrayal of dealing with mental illness in general - exposing the feelings and thoughts behind someone struggling. The context of it being a problem due to radioactivity sensitivity wasn't explored deep enough for me to buy into that being the heroine's ailment.

    If anything, Everywhere Antennas is even more striking than Delporte's first book, Journal (2013, Koyama Press). Her gorgeous colored pencil drawings are a constant aesthetic delight, and I love that she allows her taped over patches and corrections to be visible to the reader, adding an organic, lived-in feel to the pages. The story itself feels underdeveloped and a little vague, but the beguiling visuals more than make up for it.

    This was an interesting, thought-provoking, but distant graphic novel. I discuss my thoughts on this comic, as well as other books discussing the fraught relationship between contemporary people and information technology at my booklikes blog, Reading Rainstorm, here.

    Ooh nuts. I forget when I read this. But I did! Also it was translated by Dascher like pretty much everything good. It's about being kind of crazy, thinking radiowaves are interfering with you, and captures that feeling well. Crazyyyy. I like Delporte's style - I hope she can translate it into something more popularly accessible, even if only slightly so.

    I love the use of colour. The illustrations are naive in style, fitting well with the diary format of the work. I wonder if the text is handwritten in that nice cursive or you can get a font for that? Translation would have been more laborous if they had to rewrite the whole thing! I wish it mentioned where Magic Hill Farm is, still in France? Or back in Quebec? Somewhere else?

    This is a bit more like a cohesive story, of wanting to escape modern (tech-fueled) woes, than her book Journal. I love the middle section at Marie's cottage, but overall it doesn't have the exciting flow that Journal does, where the images and sentences didn't match up but rather expanded off each other. Which is really the joy of a sketchy book, all handwritten in colored pencils, isn't it?

    Comme d'habitude, j'ai adoré le graphisme de Julie Delporte. Certaines de ses pages mériteraient d'être encadrées et accrochées sur mes murs. J'ai moins aimé "l'histoire" qui navigue entre passage dépressif et intolérance à ces fameuses antennes qui peuplent nos paysages urbains.

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