Bamboo and Butterflies: From Refugee to Citizen

Bamboo and Butterflies: From Refugee to Citizen

Bamboo and Butterflies From Refugee to Citizen Bamboo Butterflies is the true story of a Cambodian family s odyssey to America and the challenges and obstacles they encounter in their struggle to assimilate After suffering hardship and deprivation

  • Title: Bamboo and Butterflies: From Refugee to Citizen
  • Author: Joan D. Criddle
  • ISBN: 9780963220509
  • Page: 386
  • Format: Paperback
  • Bamboo Butterflies is the true story of a Cambodian family s odyssey to America and the challenges and obstacles they encounter in their struggle to assimilate After suffering hardship and deprivation under the Khmer Rouge s regime, Eun Bun s four daughters, along with their husbands and children, arrive in California with no money and no idea what their adopted couBamboo Butterflies is the true story of a Cambodian family s odyssey to America and the challenges and obstacles they encounter in their struggle to assimilate After suffering hardship and deprivation under the Khmer Rouge s regime, Eun Bun s four daughters, along with their husbands and children, arrive in California with no money and no idea what their adopted country would really be like Humorous and poignant, their first experiences in America offer a unique perspective on what it is like to be a stranger in a strange land.

    • Best Read [Joan D. Criddle] Ø Bamboo and Butterflies: From Refugee to Citizen || [Thriller Book] PDF ¿
      386 Joan D. Criddle
    • thumbnail Title: Best Read [Joan D. Criddle] Ø Bamboo and Butterflies: From Refugee to Citizen || [Thriller Book] PDF ¿
      Posted by:Joan D. Criddle
      Published :2019-07-23T11:59:24+00:00

    780 Comment

    This is based on the true story of a family who flees their native Cambodia to come to the US. It goes over the family's struggle to become familiar with a new country while attempting to leave painful memories of the old behind.The story is written by their neighbor (Joan Criddle) who befriends them and with time learns their story. The writing is choppy and poorly written. Even at times, Joan seems to focus more on herself than on the family. I didn't want to learn about her, I wanted to learn [...]

    This is a very moving book. It deeply touched me because one of my best friends when I was about 12 (she was 13) was Ni. She and her family Taun Wan/Taun Van came to Majuro from Cambodia. Of course in 1972 in Micronesia this meant nothing to us kids. But, she would never want to play "war games" and finally we asked why. She was in the back of the truck with a machine gun as her family made its escape. We found other things to do.Later at the DPMO office as I educated myself on the Southeast Asi [...]

    In response to Jon's accusations, I thought I'd write a quick review: Despite the oh so romantic title of the book, it's just a straightforward chronicle of a few related characters recently immigrated from Cambodia. In turn they each describe their experiences with a variety of pertinent emigre issues. They're endearing enough, but the writing is pure textbook and the conclusions often repetitive. I should have taken Jon's advice and started with To Destroy You Is No Loss. Could my love for Cam [...]

    The sequel to "To Destroy You Is No Loss," this one tells the story of Teeda's life after she made it to the United States. It's an interesting, telling, and sometime humorous account of the modern-day immigrant experience in America. Really, it's a collection of oral narratives. Again, the content is the import, not the form.

    I first read To Destroy You is no Loss as a freshman in college. I didn't know there was a sequel until now. This was a great book to show the struggles that immigrants have when they have to adjust to a completely new language and culture. I know I have been thinking more of the struggles my ESL students face.

    This book was the follow up to the book To Destroy You is no Loss. It tells about the lives of the refugees after they have come to America. I enjoyed reading it to find out what became of these people who endured such a tragic experience and adapted to life in a new country.

    Not quite as good as the first book, but reading about how the family adapted to Stateside life was very interesting.

    My grandma's book! Continues the story of the family in "To Destroy You is No Loss", chronicling their experiences adapting to life in America.

    It was cool to continue following the people from To Destroy You is No Loss. The book got repetitive in spots, though.

    I really like this it is a sequel to To Destroy you is no loss. It got repetitive at times but very interesting and made me more aware and hopefully more compassionate to the plight of an immigrant.

    This was a very hopeful and inspiring bookI learned a ton from both of Joan D. Criddle's books but this one was much easier to read and really motivating!

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