Edison's Conquest of Mars: The Original 1898 Sequel to The War of the Worlds

Edison's Conquest of Mars: The Original 1898 Sequel to The War of the Worlds

Edison s Conquest of Mars The Original Sequel to The War of the Worlds Following in the footsteps of one of the greatest science fiction masterpieces ever written this long forgotten sequel to The War of the Worlds boasts Thomas Edison as its hero Originally published i

  • Title: Edison's Conquest of Mars: The Original 1898 Sequel to The War of the Worlds
  • Author: Garrett P. Serviss Robert Godwin
  • ISBN: 9780973820300
  • Page: 299
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Following in the footsteps of one of the greatest science fiction masterpieces ever written, this long forgotten sequel to The War of the Worlds boasts Thomas Edison as its hero Originally published in the late 1800s, this is one of the rarest and most important cornerstones of the science fiction genre Turning the original Wells tale on its head, this novel weaves a dFollowing in the footsteps of one of the greatest science fiction masterpieces ever written, this long forgotten sequel to The War of the Worlds boasts Thomas Edison as its hero Originally published in the late 1800s, this is one of the rarest and most important cornerstones of the science fiction genre Turning the original Wells tale on its head, this novel weaves a distinct and astonishing story of humans invading Mars, marking the invention of the space techno thriller Presenting a cornucopia of technical ingenuity, this edition marks a variety of firsts in the genre the first space battle ever to appear in print, the original fictional example of alien abduction, the introduction of the theory that the pyramids were constructed by extraterrestrials, and the first truly functional spacesuits Complete and unabridged for the first time ever including the original illustrations this narrative also features an introductory essay by acclaimed author Robert Godwin.

    Edison s Conquest of Mars Edison s Conquest of Mars Serviss, Garrett P Edison s Conquest of Mars is an interesting and fairly enjoyable psycho sequel to the H.G Wells classic The War of the Worlds and, accurately, a direct sequel to Fighters from Mars, which was a blatant rewrite of War of the Worlds This book was mentioned on a satirical site I like as introducing many Sci Fi first, including alien abductions, spacesuits, and a host of other Edisons Conquest of Mars Serviss, Garrett P Aug , This shopping feature will continue to load items when the Enter key is pressed In order to navigate out of this carousel please use your heading shortcut key to navigate to the next or previous heading Back Edison s Conquest of Mars The Original Sequel to The War of the Worlds Garrett P Serviss. Edisons Conquest of Mars by Garrett P Serviss Edison s Conquest of Mars is about what you would expect from a story written by a journalist and serialized in a daily newspaper The plot jumps around, with characters appearing and disappearing as needed The story actually gets a lot of the science right descriptions of gravity, electromagnetism, and the vacuum of space are pretty accurate. Edison s Conquest of Mars The Original Sequel to The A sequel to a plagiarized version of War of the Worlds, Edison s Conquest of Mars is one of the most ridiculously entertaining books I ve read in some time While the writing nor subject matter of the book is hardly revolutionary, it does contain many innovations for the genre of science fiction. Edisons Conquest of Mars Large Print Garrett P Serviss This shopping feature will continue to load items when the Enter key is pressed In order to navigate out of this carousel please use your heading shortcut key to navigate to the next or previous heading Back Edison s Conquest of Mars The Original Sequel to The War of the Worlds Garrett P Serviss. Edisons Conquest of Mars Critical Essays eNotes Edisons Conquest of Mars was written in a hurry, beginning daily serialization in William Randolph Hearsts The New York Evening Journal immediately after the conclusion of The War of the Worlds was Edison s Conquest of Mars Garrett P Serviss Free Edison s Conquest of Mars, by Garrett P Serviss, is one of the many science fiction novels published in the nineteenth century Although science fiction was not at the time thought of as a distinct literary genre, it was a very popular literary form, with almost every fiction magazine regularly publishing science fiction stories and novels. Edison s Conquest of Mars by Garrett Putman Serviss Free Aug , Edison s Conquest of Mars by Garrett Putman Serviss Download Bibrec Bibliographic Record Author Serviss, Garrett Putman, Title Edison s Conquest of Mars Language English LoC Class PS Language and Literatures American and Canadian literature Subject Science fiction Subject Martians Fiction ECO Edison Chouest Offshore ECO operates over offshore vessels, most of which were designed, engineered and built by Chouest ECO also offers expansive port facilities at Port Fourchon and subsea solutions.

    • Free Download [Classics Book] ☆ Edison's Conquest of Mars: The Original 1898 Sequel to The War of the Worlds - by Garrett P. Serviss Robert Godwin ✓
      299 Garrett P. Serviss Robert Godwin
    • thumbnail Title: Free Download [Classics Book] ☆ Edison's Conquest of Mars: The Original 1898 Sequel to The War of the Worlds - by Garrett P. Serviss Robert Godwin ✓
      Posted by:Garrett P. Serviss Robert Godwin
      Published :2020-03-17T04:55:11+00:00

    124 Comment

    Not one of the great books of science fiction history, this is arguably War of the Worlds and Thomas Edison fan fiction. Nevertheless, it introduced such science fictional concepts as space suits, asteroid mining, disintegrator pistols, and alien abduction (yes, Mars does need women!) Serviss presents a very lush and wet version of Mars, where the canals exist primarily to direct the waters where they want them -- an idea which didn't really have any scientific support even at the time. The lang [...]

    Vale a pena ler este livro para ter uma ideia do que foram as edisonades, um sub-género literário inspirado na fama do inventor Edison que o colocava como personagem de mirabolantes aventuras em que as suas invenções eram determinantes para o final feliz. Talvez uma comparação actual possa ser feita com obras que colocam personagens históricos reais em aventuras ficcionais de género fantástico. O termo edisonade foi criado por John Clute e Peter Nicholls precisamente para designar este [...]

    I picked this one up for two reasons: The novelty that came with learning of a contemporary sequel to The War of the Worlds that I'd never heard of, and the idea of an 1890s story depicting interplanetary warfare with, as the book jacket promised me, "a cornucopia of technical ingenuity."As a sequel to The War of the Worlds, the book doesn't hold up very well. Not only is it a totally different kind of story, but it ignores virtually all the commentary on humanity that made Wells' book a classic [...]

    For this reading I found myself going to the past to read of the future. From 1898: “Edison’s Conquest of Mars” by Garrett P. Serviss is a sequel to H.G. Well’s “The War of the Worlds.” I stumbled on this book at the local Barnes & Noble as I perused the shelves. It’s a fascinating read. While the style was not modern, more than once I’d find myself checking the validity of this book on the internet because of what it was foretelling for the time it was written: spacesuits, s [...]

    This book has been called a sequel to The War of the Worlds, but it is at best a thematic sequel. The Martians are quite different from Wells’ Martians, and, in fact, Serviss’ story was initially serialized only about six weeks after the conclusion of the serialization of The War of the Worlds. (However, Serviss was a journalist used to working quickly and on deadline, so it is possible that he was able to start writing his book before Wells was finished.) Edison’s Conquest of Mars is abou [...]

    This book, while not actually a true sequel to War of the Worlds can still be "envisioned" as one. The martians look nothing like they do in Wells' book, but the descriptions don't really give this away, its the illustrations that do. However, I gave that a hearty "forget" you, and pictured the martians as I felt. (Aren't books great?) As for the actual story line, the "SCIENCE!!!" used in it is rather interesting and really made me think, and many commonly used science fiction ideas are establi [...]

    I finally gave up on this one. As fanfic of War of the Worlds, it is entertaining, but I kept putting it down and abandoning it for months. It is, as mentioned in the Cracked article that turned me onto it, the precursor to many of the common terms we hear in science fiction movies/books/TV/graphic novels today ("Reverse the polarity!", Ray guns, and the like), and features a veritable cast of characters out of the greatest minds of the 19th century (nevermind that Tesla and Edison would have st [...]

    It's difficult to believe that this was written at the end of the 19th century, decades before mankind had any first- or second-hand knowledge of what lay beyond the earth; in fact, in an era when controlled flight of aircraft beyond gliders didn't exist. Serviss describes spacesuits, the effects of weightlessness, the makeup of comets, etc. to an eerie degree of accuracy. If the afterword is to be believed, this was seminal in other ways as well: among other tropes, this may have been the first [...]

    Hmmm one should take the line The sequel to War of the Worlds with a big pinch of salt! The two are as chalk and cheese-Serviss's martians are merely giant humans, repulsive but human nonetheless. Mars itself is watery, not barren-completely different to Wells's approach! Still a decent enough story, if a bit cliched in parts-but then, this was written in 1898! The social aspects are still better than E E Smith's treatment in Triplanetary from 1920-less sexism and chauvinism, and better science [...]

    I discovered this little-known sequel to War of the Worlds from an article on Cracked. The prose is formidable, reminiscent of HP Lovecraft's, but without all the tentacles. Have to wonder what Thomas Edison thought about being portrayed as a combination genius inventory and military mastermind.

    Light Victorian fare (though American). Thomas Edison's elevation to savior of the world is rather amusing, especially as he endorsed the novel himself (surprise, surprise). Reads similar to Edgar Rice Burroughs' style, though ERB is the better writer, IMO.Still, for SF fans, an interesting read as this includes the first fictional mention of spacesuits, asteroid mining, and more, so if you're a fan of the genre, this has some worth.

    This book was pretty good. The story was entertaining, although it kinda had issues towards the end. There were a few things that were brought up but not really explored enough. Also, it's only vaguely a sequel to War of the Worlds, as amongst other things the nature of the Martians is changed. It's a pretty fast read, though, and fairly entertaining.

    A fan-fic sequel to H.G. Wells' War of the Worlds and not as good as the original. Following the failure of the Martian invasion in War of the Worlds, American scientist Thomas Edison devises a disintegration ray gun and an electrical spacecraft(Why he didn't use these the first time?) to be used in a united world invasion of Mars in order to prevent further attacks.

    I'm not sure if I'll ever finish this book. But it is an interesting glimpse into early 20th century spec fiction, and fans of H.G. Wells and Jules Verne will see much they recognize here.If you're looking for a slice of life, peek back through time, this is definitely it. But it's definitely no Under the Moons of Mars, or Star Wars.

    Oh deary me. A treasure trove full of science fiction firsts, but also a piece of militaristic propaganda for nastyman Edison. From the description of the electric drive of the ships to the mechanism of the final battle, most of the book is hard to take seriously with the Aryan couple at the end maybe taking the wedding cake.

    Listened to podcast from librivox. So that's what happened after the Martians attacked the earth in "War of the Worlds". Interesting view of Mars in 1898. Thank you Mr. Edison. (Must read "War of the Worlds" and other narrations of the Martian attacks on earth.)

    Here's a real oddity: a knock-off of H.G. Wells' WAR OF THE WORLDS, published in America in 1898, featuring Thomas Edison as the main character (with his permission, no less). Some basic sf tropes and themes are introduced in the book, but it really hasn't aged well.

    an attempt was made at a sequel to "War of the Worlds" I wonder how the protagonist, Edison, fears, I must read it sometime "War of the Worlds" is one of my favs

    How very Verne. And old. But not without its charm, in a quaint, Wyndham-like way. Vastly dated now, nonetheless an intriguing look into prevailing attitudes of the day.

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